American community – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 20:28:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://conservativepetitions.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png American community – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ 32 32 U.S. Ambassador Meets with Local Cambodian American Community https://conservativepetitions.com/u-s-ambassador-meets-with-local-cambodian-american-community/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 17:31:05 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/u-s-ambassador-meets-with-local-cambodian-american-community/ By Samantha PakNorthwest Asia Weekly United States Ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy (right) As United States Ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy is responsible for representing the United States in Cambodia. Part of that job is to strengthen the relationship between the two countries – and the approximately 330,000 people of Cambodian descent living […]]]>

By Samantha Pak
Northwest Asia Weekly

United States Ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy (right)

As United States Ambassador to Cambodia, W. Patrick Murphy is responsible for representing the United States in Cambodia.

Part of that job is to strengthen the relationship between the two countries – and the approximately 330,000 people of Cambodian descent living in the United States play an important role in that relationship. So when the Seattle-Sihanoukville Sister City Association (Sea-Sih) invited him to visit Seattle and meet the local Cambodian American community, Murphy agreed, telling Northwest Asian Weekly it was a “great opportunity.”

But with a job that requires him to spend most of his time abroad, it wasn’t until June 27 that this opportunity materialized. Murphy’s day trip to Seattle was part of his first international trip in about a year. He came at the end of his visit to the United States, having spent a few days in the other Washington before coming to Emerald City and then returning to Cambodia.

Murphy’s stay in Seattle included meeting with members of the local Cambodian American community and Port of Seattle officials, a visit to the University of Washington’s Southeast Asia Center, and meeting with members of the school’s Khmer Student Association. Murphy concluded his visit with a dinner reception at China Harbor in Seattle, hosted by Sea-Sih and the Cambodian American Community Council of Washington (CACCWA).

“We are lucky, very, very lucky,” said Bill Oung, CACCWA co-founder and interim chairman of the board, of Murphy’s experience and his willingness to meet the community. “[Seattle is] a community close to his heart, [U.S. Embassy in Cambodia].”

Murphy was appointed Ambassador in August 2019. Prior to this position, his work in the US Foreign Service began in 1992. He served in diplomatic missions in Burma (Myanmar), China, Iraq, Guinea and Mali. His most recent positions include leading the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs as a senior bureau official (Acting Assistant Secretary of State) from 2018 to 2019, and as Deputy Under Secretary of State for Southeast Asia from 2016 to 2018.

Speaking at the reception, Murphy told attendees it was a pleasure to visit Seattle, commenting on the area’s love of coffee as well as the heat wave that coincided with his visit, which many told him. had said. Dressed in a dark blue suit, he reminded the crowd that he spends most of his time in Cambodia.

“You forget where you came from,” joked Murphy, laughing from a room full of many people who had emigrated from the tropical country.

Cambodia and COVID-19

In his speech, Murphy discussed the state of Cambodia, including how the country has been affected during the pandemic.

With COVID-19 having limited travel in recent years, Sea-Sih’s overseas programs, which focus on cultural exchange between Seattle and the Cambodian port city of Sihanoukville, have gone on hiatus. That’s one of the reasons Murphy’s visit to Seattle was important to the local Cambodian community, said Sea-Sih board member Thyda Ros. It was a chance for them to learn about what happened in Cambodia, how COVID-19 is treated, people’s access to health care and how the pandemic has impacted the economy and people. people’s livelihoods.

“It’s something our community wants to hear,” Ros said, adding that Murphy’s visit was also an opportunity for the local community – many of whom still have loved ones in Cambodia – to let the ambassador know what are their concerns about Southeast Asia. countries, and what the United States can do to support the effort in a meaningful way.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for our community to have our voices heard.”

From a public health perspective, Murphy said Cambodia has weathered the pandemic quite well. The United States and Cambodia have a longstanding relationship in this area – with organizations and agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, and the United States Navy in Cambodia and have helped the country combat other infectious diseases in the past. .

“It helped Cambodia through the pandemic,” Murphy said. Thanks to public awareness campaigns on safety measures such as washing hands, wearing masks and social distancing, the country has recorded low death and hospitalization rates. Additionally, Cambodia has a very high vaccination rate, with people queuing to get vaccinated once it – and subsequent boosters and age group openings – become available. The United States also donated 3 million doses of the vaccine to Cambodia, and plans to donate more this year, Murphy said.

“We are proud to be part of this history”

While the country’s public health has fared well during the pandemic, Murphy said Cambodia’s economy has been hit as it relies heavily on tourism. And with almost no tourism for about two years, many people have lost their jobs and their wages. In addition, he said, migrant workers who worked abroad returned home, adding another mouth to feed in the households of their families, many of whom were already coping with less income.

That being said, some of this economic impact has been mitigated by the fact that Cambodia has continued to develop its export sector, particularly in textiles – expanding by 30% last year, with an expected expansion of 40 % this year – with the United States. being its biggest market, Murphy said.

“That means a lot of jobs in Cambodia,” he said.

International relations and the fight against crime

Other topics Murphy touched on include Cambodia being the president of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations this year. The role rotates annually among the 10 member countries and involves organizing meetings with representatives from all levels of countries in the region, as well as other partner countries, throughout the year. This also includes a summit with heads of state and national leaders, with this year scheduled for the fall.

Additionally, Murphy explained how the Embassy works to help return heritage items and antiquities looted from Cambodia whenever they are discovered around the world.

“We are doing our part to restore them,” he said.

He also told Northwest Asian Weekly how fighting international crime, which includes trafficking (in human beings, narcotics and flora), as well as financial crimes that cross borders, is part of his job, and that Cambodia is no exception to these problems.

Questions from the audience

Following his speech, those present at the reception had the opportunity to ask questions of the Ambassador. One referred to the recent U.S. Supreme Court overturning of Roe v. Wade.

Murphy spoke about the importance of women’s health around the world, noting that women in Cambodia carry many burdens and that he is proud of them – of their success in the classrooms and in business – everything recognizing that they always reach ceilings and do not hold much leadership. posts.

“Their health is important,” Murphy said.

Cambodia’s electoral process, the arrest and sentencing of Cambodian American lawyer Theary Seng and dozens of members of a now defunct political opposition party for alleged treason were also questioned by members of the audience. In response, Murphy spoke of the importance of people being able to speak freely, which is a key part of democracy, although he added that the best form of government for Cambodia is for Cambodians to decide.

Murphy noted that people asked him tough questions, which he liked, and that he rarely got those types of questions in Cambodia because people didn’t feel as free to say what they thought.


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Black Excellence | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/black-excellence-richmond-free-press-2/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 22:23:47 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/black-excellence-richmond-free-press-2/ We often hear the phrase “black excellence,” especially when black people, individually or collectively, achieve the seemingly impossible. It’s a fitting reward for the legions of black men, women and young people who come forward and show us their best selves after surviving countless obstacles in their professional or personal lives. In every issue of […]]]>

We often hear the phrase “black excellence,” especially when black people, individually or collectively, achieve the seemingly impossible.

It’s a fitting reward for the legions of black men, women and young people who come forward and show us their best selves after surviving countless obstacles in their professional or personal lives.

In every issue of the Richmond Free Press, it’s easy to find examples of black excellence because almost every page offers our readers a glimpse of someone somewhere who makes us proud, gives us pause or brings us joy.

Take S. Bernard Goodwyn, who was on the cover of the June 9-11 edition of the Free Press just hours after his inauguration as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia. Chief Justice Goodwyn, 60, was appointed to the court in 2007, unanimously elected by the General Assembly in 2008 and re-elected in 2020. Notably, Chief Justice Goodwyn is the second African American to serve the position of Chief Justice, with the late Justice Leroy H. Hassell Sr. appointed the court’s first black Chief Justice in 2003 until his death in 2011.

From humble beginnings in Southampton County, Chief Justice Goodwyn, a graduate of Harvard University and University of Virginia Law School, became the first African-American judge appointed to the General District Court. of the once all-white, all-male Chesapeake in 1995. Two years later, he was appointed to the Circuit Court. Prior to becoming a judge, Judge Goodwyn handled civil, commercial and civil rights litigation for Wilcox and Savage, a prestigious Norfolk law firm. Although some Chesapeake-area blacks were lukewarm to his first judicial appointment, saying he knew little about the community, Chief Justice Goodwyn quickly won them over.

“I don’t quite understand people’s concerns (about me),” newly appointed Judge Goodwyn told a Norfolk reporter 27 years ago, adding that he had not deliberately tried to draw political favors from anyone. “I always thought I was very involved in the community and will continue to be.”

A more recent decision from the Virginia Supreme Court that shows it remains in tune with the community includes a September 2021 order to remove the 131-year-old statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The lawsuit was filed in 2020 to challenge the then government. Orders from Ralph Northam to remove the statue. The governor’s order came following protests that erupted after George Floyd, a black man, was murdered by a white police officer in Minneapolis. Other triggers that year included the killings of Breonna Taylor, also by law enforcement, in Louisville, Ky., and Ahmaud Arbery by white men near Brunswick, Ga. Richmonders and others reacted vandalizing the statue and demanding its removal.

In making his ruling, Justice Goodwyn wrote that following the wording of a bill drafted nearly a century and a half ago prohibiting the repeal of the law would limit the government’s free speech rights.

“The General Assembly of 1889 had no power to bind in perpetuity the exercise of the word of government by future administrations by the mere expedient of a joint resolution,” Judge Goodwyn wrote in a 26-page opinion. .

“The Commonwealth has the power to cease engaging in any form of government speech when the message conveyed by the expression changes to one which the Commonwealth does not support, even if some Citizens members disagree for, ultimately, the control of the discourse of Commonwealth government must be the electoral process, and not the contrary beliefs of a section of the citizens, or of a nineteenth-century governor and legislature,” he wrote again.

Black Excellence.

The Richmond Free Press also announced in that same June 9-11 issue Dominion Energy and the Library of Virginia’s annual recognition of black men and women who have demonstrated extraordinary talent and tenacity in overcoming obstacles to success. From labor leader Samuel H. Clark, who fought to improve conditions for black railroad workers, to NASA engineer Christyl C. Johnson. Ms. Johnson, executive director of the National Science and Technology Council at the White House from 2008 to 2010, is shaping Goddard’s future spaceflight missions in the fields of planetary, astrophysics, heliophysics and Earth Science. A prolific advocate for STEM education for women and girls, she constantly reminds them that the sky is limitless.

During a June 16 program for this year’s “Strong” honorees, octogenarian Henry L. Marsh, former mayor of Richmond and retired Virginia senator, paid a moving video tribute to his former legal partner Samuel L. Tucker, who was recognized posthumously. Mr. Tucker was part of legal teams that sued to reopen public schools in Prince Edward County when they closed rather than desegregate after Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Mr. Tucker also fought, in court, to end tuition subsidies for white students to attend private academies, his Library of Virginia biography notes. He argued the landmark case of Green v. New Kent County School Board, in which the United States Supreme Court ruled in 1968 that local school boards must immediately implement desegregation strategies. Mr. Tucker’s continual battles for equal justice led to a failed attempt by white lawyers to disbar him in the early 1960s.

Black Excellence.

This spring to summer season of recognizing extraordinary leaders and Commonwealth achievements continues. The work of several Virginians in athletics, education and theater will be highlighted at the Virginia Interscholastic Association Heritage Association Hall of Fame Awards Ceremony on June 24 in Charlottesville.

The Hall of Fame helps preserve the legacy of African American students and adults who participated in the Virginia Interscholastic Association from 1954 to 1970, as well as its predecessor, the Virginia Interscholastic Athletic League, which ensured that that black students in segregated high schools excel beyond the classroom. Among this year’s honorees are two people working to restore or preserve the legacy of their former all-black high schools, Virginia State University’s first female athletic director, a woman who helped develop GPS, two outstanding athletes and a Golden Globe and NAACP Image Award nominee.

Black Excellence.


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Black Excellence | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/black-excellence-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/black-excellence-richmond-free-press/ We often hear the phrase “black excellence,” especially when black people, individually or collectively, achieve the seemingly impossible. It’s a fitting reward for the legions of black men, women and young people who come forward and show us their best selves after surviving countless obstacles in their professional or personal lives. In every issue of […]]]>

We often hear the phrase “black excellence,” especially when black people, individually or collectively, achieve the seemingly impossible.

It’s a fitting reward for the legions of black men, women and young people who come forward and show us their best selves after surviving countless obstacles in their professional or personal lives.

In every issue of the Richmond Free Press, it’s easy to find examples of black excellence because almost every page offers our readers a glimpse of someone somewhere who makes us proud, gives us pause or brings us joy.

Take S. Bernard Goodwyn, who was on the cover of the June 9-11 edition of the Free Press just hours after his inauguration as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia. Chief Justice Goodwyn, 60, was appointed to the court in 2007, unanimously elected by the General Assembly in 2008 and re-elected in 2020. Notably, Chief Justice Goodwyn is the second African American to serve the position of Chief Justice, with the late Justice Leroy H. Hassell Sr. appointed the court’s first black Chief Justice in 2003 until his death in 2011.

From humble beginnings in Southampton County, Chief Justice Goodwyn, a graduate of Harvard University and University of Virginia Law School, became the first African-American judge appointed to the General District Court. of the once all-white, all-male Chesapeake in 1995. Two years later, he was appointed to the Circuit Court. Prior to becoming a judge, Judge Goodwyn handled civil, commercial and civil rights litigation for Wilcox and Savage, a prestigious Norfolk law firm. Although some Chesapeake-area blacks were lukewarm to his first judicial appointment, saying he knew little about the community, Chief Justice Goodwyn quickly won them over.

“I don’t quite understand people’s concerns (about me),” newly appointed Judge Goodwyn told a Norfolk reporter 27 years ago, adding that he had not deliberately tried to draw political favors from anyone. “I always thought I was very involved in the community and will continue to be.”

A more recent decision from the Virginia Supreme Court that shows it remains in tune with the community includes a September 2021 order to remove the 131-year-old statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. The lawsuit was filed in 2020 to challenge the then government. Orders from Ralph Northam to remove the statue. The governor’s order came following protests that erupted after George Floyd, a black man, was murdered by a white police officer in Minneapolis. Other triggers that year included the killings of Breonna Taylor, also by law enforcement, in Louisville, Ky., and Ahmaud Arbery by white men near Brunswick, Ga. Richmonders and others reacted vandalizing the statue and demanding its removal.

In making his ruling, Justice Goodwyn wrote that following the wording of a bill drafted nearly a century and a half ago prohibiting the repeal of the law would limit the government’s free speech rights.

“The General Assembly of 1889 had no power to bind in perpetuity the exercise of the word of government by future administrations by the mere expedient of a joint resolution,” Judge Goodwyn wrote in a 26-page opinion. .

“The Commonwealth has the power to cease engaging in any form of government speech when the message conveyed by the expression changes to one which the Commonwealth does not support, even if some Citizens members disagree for, ultimately, the control of the discourse of Commonwealth government must be the electoral process, and not the contrary beliefs of a section of the citizens, or of a nineteenth-century governor and legislature,” he wrote again.

Black Excellence.

The Richmond Free Press also announced in that same June 9-11 issue Dominion Energy and the Library of Virginia’s annual recognition of black men and women who have demonstrated extraordinary talent and tenacity in overcoming obstacles to success. From labor leader Samuel H. Clark, who fought to improve conditions for black railroad workers, to NASA engineer Christyl C. Johnson. Ms. Johnson, executive director of the National Science and Technology Council at the White House from 2008 to 2010, is shaping Goddard’s future spaceflight missions in the fields of planetary, astrophysics, heliophysics and Earth Science. A prolific advocate for STEM education for women and girls, she constantly reminds them that the sky is limitless.

During a June 16 program for this year’s “Strong” honorees, octogenarian Henry L. Marsh, former mayor of Richmond and retired Virginia senator, paid a moving video tribute to his former legal partner Samuel L. Tucker, who was recognized posthumously. Mr. Tucker was part of legal teams that sued to reopen public schools in Prince Edward County when they closed rather than desegregate after Brown v. Board of Education (1954). Mr. Tucker also fought, in court, to end tuition subsidies for white students to attend private academies, his Library of Virginia biography notes. He argued the landmark case of Green v. New Kent County School Board, in which the United States Supreme Court ruled in 1968 that local school boards must immediately implement desegregation strategies. Mr. Tucker’s continual battles for equal justice led to an unsuccessful attempt by white lawyers to disbar him in the early 1960s.

Black Excellence.

This spring to summer season of recognizing extraordinary leaders and Commonwealth achievements continues. The work of several Virginians in athletics, education and theater will be highlighted at the Virginia Interscholastic Association Heritage Association Hall of Fame Awards Ceremony on June 24 in Charlottesville.

The Hall of Fame helps preserve the legacy of African American students and adults who participated in the Virginia Interscholastic Association from 1954 to 1970, as well as its predecessor, the Virginia Interscholastic Athletic League, which ensured that that black students in segregated high schools excel beyond the classroom. Among this year’s honorees are two people working to restore or preserve the legacy of their former all-black high schools, Virginia State University’s first female athletic director, a woman who helped develop GPS, two outstanding athletes and a Golden Globe and NAACP Image Award nominee.

Black Excellence.


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June 19 concert celebrates the life, freedom and contributions of the African-American community | Local https://conservativepetitions.com/june-19-concert-celebrates-the-life-freedom-and-contributions-of-the-african-american-community-local/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/june-19-concert-celebrates-the-life-freedom-and-contributions-of-the-african-american-community-local/ Sweet notes of blues and jazz filled the air as singer Josephine Howell performed a rendition of “I Believe I Can Fly” at Seasons Performance Hall on Sunday. His arms gracefully outstretched to appear like wings, Howell sang with emotion, letting the sound float with the deep percussion of the drum and the altissimo chirps […]]]>

Sweet notes of blues and jazz filled the air as singer Josephine Howell performed a rendition of “I Believe I Can Fly” at Seasons Performance Hall on Sunday.

His arms gracefully outstretched to appear like wings, Howell sang with emotion, letting the sound float with the deep percussion of the drum and the altissimo chirps of the saxophone.

She and her attendants produced a moving celebration of freedom for the June 19 holiday, also remembering community members lost during the pandemic and marking the many contributions African American and Black artists have made to the world of music. music.






Jenifer Wells and her sister, Shana Cartmell, pose for a photo outside Seasons Performance Hall on June 19, 2022, in Yakima.



The audience for the event looked like what America should look like, community leader Esther Huey said when opening the program at The Seasons.

“I just want to tell you how happy I am that each of you has come forward to help us celebrate this important date, this important moment in our fight for freedom, justice and inclusion,” he said. she declared.

June 19 story

Juneteenth, a holiday celebrated for more than a century by the African American community and added to the federal calendar in 2021, commemorates the delayed emancipation of enslaved African Americans in the United States years after the proclamation was signed of emancipation.

The Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, but it wasn’t until more than two years later, on June 19, 1865, that the word of freedom reached still-enslaved African Americans in the state. Texas Confederate. Huey said she could imagine the joy and happiness that filled their hearts after hearing that they were free.

“They cry, they rejoice and they just breathe this happiness,” she said on the show. “They didn’t know what tomorrow would bring, but they knew that day they were free and they started celebrating.”

The African-American community is still fighting for full equality and justice — “So much blood has been shed for where we are today,” Huey said — but it’s also at a turning point.

“I see a difference in Yakima, especially right now,” Huey continued. “I see people becoming more aware, more educated, more informed about why this is important to us, but more than that, why is it important for America to celebrate the contributions that African Americans have made .”

The Seattle singer Howell began the musical part of the evening by thanking her elders for the sacrifices made with grace, elegance and excellence.

“Thank you for the shoulders we stand on,” she said. “Thank you for standing tall and thank you for remembering that your life is not just about your life, but it affects everyone.”







June 16 concert

Audience members stand and applaud during the June 19 Celebration Concert at Seasons Performance Hall on June 19, 2022 in Yakima.



excellence in music

Music is a gift to African American and black communities, Howell said Sunday.

“It’s our way of expressing ourselves. It’s our way of keeping the story alive,” she said. “It’s how we keep talking when they try to steal our language.”

Howell led audiences on a musical journey through gospel, blues and jazz – just some of the many genres to come from black artists and musical traditions.

The set included the witty “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”; gospel “Something about the name of Jesus”; blues “I have a house of 20 rooms”; and “All Blues” jazz.

Howell was joined by Andra Green on keyboard, Herman Brown on guitar, Christopher Patin on drums, Medearis Dixson on saxophone and vocalists Josephine Carson, Donna Kirvin and Phyllis Talley.

Music isn’t the only way to convey stories and experiences from a stage. Community member Evelyn Malone performed Sojourner Truth’s “Ain’t I a Woman” during the program, sharing the art of speaking in a speech originally penned and delivered by the abolitionist and activist at the Human Rights Convention women in 1851.

The Juneteenth celebration concert was the first of its kind held at Yakima and Seasons Performance Hall, although other Juneteenth performances and events took place over the weekend. Seasons director Pat Strosahl said the venue’s board is committed to hosting an annual June 19 music celebration for at least the next five years.

“(Music) is how we access a part of our soul, and I’m so grateful we got that tonight,” Strosahl said.

Towards the end of the event, Howell asked audience members to reflect on the evening. The live performances and the community are something special, she said.

“It’s really important that you don’t walk out of here the way you came in. Otherwise, you could have just turned on the radio.”


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ARHS junior raises awareness in the Asian American community https://conservativepetitions.com/arhs-junior-raises-awareness-in-the-asian-american-community-2/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 16:10:30 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/arhs-junior-raises-awareness-in-the-asian-american-community-2/ A junior from Amherst Regional High School plays a key role in advocating for a new law that would require public schools to teach ethnic studies and racial justice. The bill, pending in the Legislative Assembly, also aims to achieve a more diverse faculty. In her role as a member of the state’s first Asian […]]]>

A junior from Amherst Regional High School plays a key role in advocating for a new law that would require public schools to teach ethnic studies and racial justice. The bill, pending in the Legislative Assembly, also aims to achieve a more diverse faculty.

In her role as a member of the state’s first Asian American and Pacific Islands Commission Youth Council – and the only representative of Western Massachusetts teens – Sea Kay Leung recently attended a rally in Boston where she spoke about the challenges she faces getting enough support in a rural area where resources are targeted at college students rather than students her own age.

“Western Massachusetts offers almost no safe space to go,” Leung said in a phone interview, noting that Boston is too far to venture out on a regular basis. “There needs to be a safe space, not only for young Asians, but also for other students of color.”

A longtime Pioneer Valley resident who lives in Belchertown, Leung said she knows from experience how her Chinese-American identity was largely absent from the school curriculum, but she also had positive feelings about some aspects of education in Amherst.

“I want people to know that when I was younger, my freshman teacher had a Chinese New Year festival, and that was the first time I felt accepted in the community,” Leung said. “I felt confident in my identity as a Chinese-American.”

While participating in AAPI Heritage Month activities on the Boston Common, an event to promote unity, solidarity and belonging, and to commemorate Asian victims of violence, Leung joined commissioners, staff members and other youth advisers. The event was organized by the New England Chinese American Association, the Coalition for Anti-Racism and Equity and the Boston Foundation’s Asian Community Fund.

Organizers wrote on the commission’s Facebook page thanking Leung and another youth council member “for speaking forcefully about their own experiences and struggles as Asian Americans. We are so proud of them. and it was inspiring to see them speak their truth on stage.

Leung said she will also work with Richard Chu, professor of history at Five College at the University of Massachusetts, and Leo Hwang, associate academic dean, CNS Advising, at UMass, who were named two of the AAPI commissioners of the western Massachusetts earlier this year. . Her hope is to give a voice to young Asians in the region so that they can be better represented in legislative actions.

Chu wrote in an email that the support he and Hwang can offer will come in many ways, such as funding related activities or programs, or working with city or state officials to promote teaching AAPI history in grades K-12. Chu said he would listen to what Leung and other members of the AAPI community see as important issues they face.

“In terms of specific areas where she can make a difference, one example she and her cohort can set is to advocate for a more inclusive curriculum and environment in their schools by hiring more AAPI teachers, adding courses that foster critical understanding and awareness of AAPI’s history and issues, or creating curricula that recognize and celebrate AAPI’s legacy,” Chu said.

Superintendent Michael Morris mentioned Leung’s role on the Amherst Regional School Board, noting it as an example of impacting lives beyond Amherst.

“(She is) a great ambassador for our school district as well as the entire state,” Morris said.

On May 16, Leung was among young people who met with two members of the Asian House Caucus, Rep. Tackey Chan, D-Quincy, and Rep. Vanna Howard, D-Lowell, for a conversation about Asian American identity, with the young advisers. able to share their struggles with growing Asian Americans.

They heard stories from both representatives about their own journeys in politics and how they overcame their personal experiences to stand up for their communities. After about two hours of discussion, Chan took the Youth Council members on a mini-tour around the State House.

In Amherst, the city council issued a proclamation, similar to one issued by Governor Charlie Baker, proclaiming May Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, with the local resolution noting that 18% of the The city’s population identifies with these groups and that they should be celebrated. The resolution also recognizes the racism and xenophobia they face, and how they are consistently overlooked and undervalued in the teaching and study of American history.

As part of the city’s work, a virtual celebration was held last month in which local Asian Americans recounted their own time in the city, including family of the first Cambodians to arrive in 1981. Although Leung did not participate, she appreciates that such a forum took place.

Next, she hopes to form an AAPI club at school, observing that it should help improve the identity of Asian Americans.

“Celebrating identity helps people feel accepted,” Leung said. “I believe every Asian American child should be celebrated.”


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June 19 celebrations unite the African-American community in Los Angeles https://conservativepetitions.com/june-19-celebrations-unite-the-african-american-community-in-los-angeles/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 00:33:15 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/june-19-celebrations-unite-the-african-american-community-in-los-angeles/ June 16th celebrations take place across the country, as well as in Southland, and hundreds of people gather to have a good time, but also to reflect on the significance of the holiday. One of the events that attracted a large mass of people was a celebration at Leimert Park. “Juneteenth belongs to black people,” […]]]>

June 16th celebrations take place across the country, as well as in Southland, and hundreds of people gather to have a good time, but also to reflect on the significance of the holiday.

One of the events that attracted a large mass of people was a celebration at Leimert Park.

“Juneteenth belongs to black people,” said UCLA student Eliza Franklin. “It’s our day and we should be able to celebrate it and be liberated and be as free and as black as we want, we deserve.”

June 16 is the day of the commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States. The Leimert Park block party showcased the rich culture of the black community.

“Everything you see here is from Ghana and is handmade or hand-sewn,” said Dedra Dixon, owner of Ghana Connection.

Dixon said her collection is her way of connecting African culture through art and fashion with us here at home.

“I feel like more people need to know their culture as African Americans, we need to be more connected,” Dixon said.

Sunday’s events were partly a day of celebration, but also a time to reflect on the country’s tragic history.

“No matter the day, this is about raising awareness to awaken people to the injustices that have been implemented by the leaders of this planet,” said Baba Musolin, one of the visitors to Leimert Park. sunday.

“I’m 64 and I’ve seen a lot of changes, and I’m thrilled that everyone can be here to come together as one rather than individually, so it’s very special for me,” said said local pastor Keith Shepard.

For others, Juneteenth is just a formality and they hope to embody the spirit of what the day means in everyday life.

“Every day for me is Juneteenth,” said WL Jackson, co-owner of a business called Grandma’s Remedy.
“Juneteenth is just another day for us to really be around each other in a larger group and for us to take the time to come and share our gifts and lift each other up and motivate each other. others.”

For those like UCLA student Franklin, Sunday’s event gave him the opportunity to enjoy his heritage and his community without fear or anxiety.

“When I look around I feel good, you hear the drums and you feel it,” Franklin said. “It’s about being around black people and being in the element and not being watched for your hair or how you look or how you’re dressed and just being able to be in community with each other.”

While many events happened over the weekend, the federal holiday is recognized on Monday.


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Good news | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/good-news-richmond-free-press-2/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:10:23 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/good-news-richmond-free-press-2/ The LEGO Group will build its first factory in the United States producing its wildly popular plastic building blocks for kids to create and build anything they can imagine in Chesterfield County. The announcement on Wednesday that the Denmark-based company has chosen Meadowville Technology Park as the site for its projected billion-dollar production facility is […]]]>

The LEGO Group will build its first factory in the United States producing its wildly popular plastic building blocks for kids to create and build anything they can imagine in Chesterfield County.

The announcement on Wednesday that the Denmark-based company has chosen Meadowville Technology Park as the site for its projected billion-dollar production facility is good news for the county and our region.

The plant, which will take up to three years to build, will be an economic boost that will have ripple effects as construction, housing and a host of other business segments will feel positive impacts.

Hundreds of people from companies large and small will be involved in building the factory over the next three years, and the world’s largest toymaker expects to create at least 1,760 well-paying jobs once it is ready. factory opened in 2025, providing a new source of employment. for residents of Richmond and surrounding areas.

The state government has only offered $75 million in incentives from programs created during former Governor Ralph Northam’s tenure to help attract business to central Virginia.

LEGO’s decision drew national and international attention, shining what current Governor Glenn A. Youngkin called “a global spotlight on the Commonwealth as the nation’s best business location.” “

We congratulate everyone involved in securing this wonderful new manufacturing addition for our region.


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Personality: Corey M. Nicholson | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-corey-m-nicholson-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:07:25 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-corey-m-nicholson-richmond-free-press/ Corey M. Nicholson’s appreciation for baseball, its history and its impact dates back to his childhood watching hours of New York Mets games on black-and-white television with his grandparents. Today, Mr. Nicholson uses his passion and knowledge for the game to guide the formative sports experiences of young people in Richmond as Chairman of the […]]]>

Corey M. Nicholson’s appreciation for baseball, its history and its impact dates back to his childhood watching hours of New York Mets games on black-and-white television with his grandparents.

Today, Mr. Nicholson uses his passion and knowledge for the game to guide the formative sports experiences of young people in Richmond as Chairman of the Board of the Metropolitan Junior Baseball League.

“I’ve always loved baseball, so I love knowing that the game I love helps our kids and our community,” says Nicholson. “I feel like, in a very small way, we’re working to save baseball in the African-American community.”

The New York native sees a deep connection between sports and African American history. Mr. Nicholson points to Jackie Robinson and the Negro Baseball League as having a major presence for the African-American community, serving as important touchstones for racial progress and equality.

Given MJBL’s historic status in Richmond and beyond since its founding in 1966, Mr. Nicholson’s involvement would seem like an obvious choice for him. He joined MJBL about 15 years ago as a volunteer, inspired by an article about the organization that prompted him to call Bill Forrester, MJBL’s chief executive and son of its founder, William MT Forrester.

Mr. Nicholson sees the non-profit league’s work as a benefit for players, boys and girls aged 4 to 19, on and off the field.

“Because of the wide range of skills used in baseball, almost anyone can excel,” Nicholson said. “MJBL wants to help develop good people, not just good players.”

Even when COVID-19 temporarily halted MJBL games, Mr. Nicholson and others continued the league’s work by hosting the Bobby Bonds Memorial Symposium from July 20 to August 10, 2020, on a virtual video platform. The symposium promotes interest in baseball among African Americans, particularly historically black college and university programs. In 2020, the program also honored the 100th anniversary of National League Baseball.

As the 56th season of MJBL begins earlier this month, Mr. Nicholson and others are exploring ways to expand MJBL’s educational and cultural programs, which range from book clubs to various initiatives with MJBL partners. .

Such programs are essential to ensure that the non-profit organization is of overall benefit to the approximately 350 children involved, as well as to maintain MJBL’s finances.

“We want to provide more opportunities for children on and off the field,” says Nicholson. “Ultimately, we need to continue to raise awareness for MJBL and hopefully convert that buzz into fundraising dollars.”

Mr. Nicholson’s strategy for achieving his goals speaks to the unwavering commitment he brings to his role and work with MJBL. It is also good advice for the children served by the association, whether in the field or in their everyday life.

“Stay focused and keep plugging in,” says Nicholson. “Small victories ultimately lead to bigger successes.”

Meet a local Richmond youth sports leader, Corey M. Nicholson:

Volunteer position: Chairman of the Metropolitan Junior Baseball League (MJBL) Board of Directors.

Occupation: Assistant Commonwealth Attorney for Henrico County.

Date and place of birth: January 21 in New York.

Where I live now: Richmond.

Education: Yale University 1986; Harvard Law School 1989.

Family: Lisa (wife); Morgan, Dominic, Jazmine, Chelsea (children); RJ, Madison, DJ, Ethan, Evan (grandchildren).

The Metropolitan Junior Baseball League (MJBL) is: A non-profit, volunteer-run organization that strives to keep organized baseball available to inner-city youth. It is one of the oldest African American youth baseball leagues.

Assignment: To provide a platform for socially and economically disadvantaged young people to realize their self-esteem through educational, athletic and cultural enrichment programs. MJBL is committed to ensuring that our young people are productive citizens who are prepared for success.

When, where and why founded: The MJBL was founded in Richmond in 1966 after several African American fathers were told their sons could not play in the established youth baseball league because of their race. With the help of several local African American businessmen, these fathers created MJBL so that all children could play organized baseball, regardless of race.

Founder(s): MJBL was founded by Dr. William MT Forrester with support from Caesar Barron and Dr. Philmore Howlette. Dr. Forrester’s son, Bill, is the current executive director.

Importance of MJBL in the world of Little League: MJBL has worked with youth baseball leagues across the country and in the Bahamas to support efforts to keep baseball alive in inner cities and low-income areas.

How I connected with MJBL: I read an article about the MJBL (I believe it was in the Richmond Free Press) and volunteered by calling Bill Forrester.

Why I’m excited about MJBL: I’ve always loved baseball, so I love knowing that the game I love helps our kids and our community. I feel like, in a very small way, we’re working to save baseball in the African American community.

MJBL is a partner of: Major League Baseball, Henrico County, City of Richmond, Richmond Police Athletic League. Frank Thornton, member of the Henrico County Board of Supervisors, was always helpful. Parney and the Flying Squirrels have been one of our biggest partners/supporters since joining.

Ways to get involved with MJBL: We are always looking to train new coaches and assistant coaches. We also need volunteers to help us with administrative tasks to keep the league running. We encourage people to support the children by coming to see a game or two.

MJBL offers: A chance for our children and the African American community to rediscover the magic of baseball and rekindle the passion we once had for the sport.

How to register your child: Visit our website MJBL.org to register online. There is also contact information if you need to talk to someone.

When and where fans can come cheer on the teams: We play games all over Richmond and Henrico, so you can find schedules on MJBL.org. We have several church groups and (fraternities and sororities) that have adopted teams to support. Please contact us if your group would like to adopt a team.

My Favorite Major League Baseball Team: New York food.

Favorite player and why: Jackie Robinson for what he means to African Americans, baseball and America. He had to endure a huge amount of hate. He handled it gracefully and overcame it. Heisaniconandarole model that all Americans can admire.

Little League baseball taught me: The need for teamwork. The rewards of hard work. The pleasure of fiery competition.

Events to come: Our current season is already underway. An MJBL team will represent the United States at the Caribbean Championships for the Bahamas July 7-11. The 31st annual MJBL Downtown Classic will take place August 3-7 in Richmond and Henrico.

A perfect day for me is: Get up early to enjoy a cup of coffee and enjoy the silence of the new day. A day at the beach with the family. End the day with good food and music with family and friends.

What I’m learning about myself during the pandemic: I drive my wife crazy if she doesn’t get regular breaks from me.

Something I love to do that most people would never imagine: Watch corny off-season Christmas movies.

A quote that inspires me: “Ignorance combined with power is the fiercest enemy justice can have.” —James Baldwin.

My friends describe me as: Calm, determined and loyal.

At the top of my to-do list: Find partners to help fund and implement a tutoring/study program for MJBL children.

Best late night snack: Cold pizzas.

Best thing my parents ever taught me: The importance of education and openness to new things to live a full and fulfilling life.

The person who influenced me the most: My parents. They were both great role models and always supported me.

Book that influenced me the most: “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” told to Alex Haley.

What I’m currently reading: Re-read Lerone Bennett Jr.’s “Before the Mayflower” so I can share it with the grandkids.

Next goal: Help make the MJBL Inner-City Classic a truly national tournament.


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Good news | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/good-news-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/good-news-richmond-free-press/ The LEGO Group will build its first factory in the United States producing its wildly popular plastic building blocks for kids to create and build anything they can imagine in Chesterfield County. The announcement on Wednesday that the Denmark-based company has chosen Meadowville Technology Park as the site for its projected billion-dollar production facility is […]]]>

The LEGO Group will build its first factory in the United States producing its wildly popular plastic building blocks for kids to create and build anything they can imagine in Chesterfield County.

The announcement on Wednesday that the Denmark-based company has chosen Meadowville Technology Park as the site for its projected billion-dollar production facility is good news for the county and our region.

The plant, which will take up to three years to build, will be an economic boost that will have ripple effects as construction, housing and a host of other business segments will feel positive impacts.

Hundreds of people from companies large and small will be involved in building the factory over the next three years, and the world’s largest toymaker expects to create at least 1,760 well-paying jobs once it is ready. factory opened in 2025, providing a new source of employment. for residents of Richmond and surrounding areas.

The state government has only offered $75 million in incentives from programs created during former Governor Ralph Northam’s tenure to help attract business to central Virginia.

LEGO’s decision drew national and international attention, shining what current Governor Glenn A. Youngkin called “a global spotlight on the Commonwealth as the nation’s best business location.” “

We congratulate everyone involved in securing this wonderful new manufacturing addition for our region.


Source link

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Personality: Corey M. Nicholson | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-corey-m-nicholson-richmond-free-press-2/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-corey-m-nicholson-richmond-free-press-2/ Corey M. Nicholson’s appreciation for baseball, its history and its impact dates back to his childhood watching hours of New York Mets games on black-and-white television with his grandparents. Today, Mr. Nicholson uses his passion and knowledge for the game to guide the formative sports experiences of young people in Richmond as Chairman of the […]]]>

Corey M. Nicholson’s appreciation for baseball, its history and its impact dates back to his childhood watching hours of New York Mets games on black-and-white television with his grandparents.

Today, Mr. Nicholson uses his passion and knowledge for the game to guide the formative sports experiences of young people in Richmond as Chairman of the Board of the Metropolitan Junior Baseball League.

“I’ve always loved baseball, so I love knowing that the game I love helps our kids and our community,” says Nicholson. “I feel like, in a very small way, we’re working to save baseball in the African-American community.”

The New York native sees a deep connection between sports and African American history. Mr. Nicholson points to Jackie Robinson and the Negro Baseball League as having a major presence for the African-American community, serving as important touchstones for racial progress and equality.

Given MJBL’s historic status in Richmond and beyond since its founding in 1966, Mr. Nicholson’s involvement would seem like an obvious choice for him. He joined MJBL about 15 years ago as a volunteer, inspired by an article about the organization that prompted him to call Bill Forrester, MJBL’s chief executive and son of its founder, William MT Forrester.

Mr. Nicholson sees the non-profit league’s work as a benefit for players, boys and girls aged 4 to 19, on and off the field.

“Because of the wide range of skills used in baseball, almost anyone can excel,” Nicholson said. “MJBL wants to help develop good people, not just good players.”

Even when COVID-19 temporarily halted MJBL games, Mr. Nicholson and others continued the league’s work by hosting the Bobby Bonds Memorial Symposium from July 20 to August 10, 2020, on a virtual video platform. The symposium promotes interest in baseball among African Americans, particularly historically black college and university programs. In 2020, the program also honored the 100th anniversary of National League Baseball.

As the 56th season of MJBL begins earlier this month, Mr. Nicholson and others are exploring ways to expand MJBL’s educational and cultural programs, which range from book clubs to various initiatives with MJBL partners. .

Such programs are essential to ensure that the non-profit organization is of overall benefit to the approximately 350 children involved, as well as to maintain MJBL’s finances.

“We want to provide more opportunities for children on and off the field,” says Nicholson. “Ultimately, we need to continue to raise awareness for MJBL and hopefully convert that buzz into fundraising dollars.”

Mr. Nicholson’s strategy for achieving his goals speaks to the unwavering commitment he brings to his role and work with MJBL. It is also good advice for the children served by the association, whether in the field or in their everyday life.

“Stay focused and keep plugging in,” says Nicholson. “Small victories ultimately lead to bigger successes.”

Meet a local Richmond youth sports leader, Corey M. Nicholson:

Volunteer position: Chairman of the Metropolitan Junior Baseball League (MJBL) Board of Directors.

Occupation: Assistant Commonwealth Attorney for Henrico County.

Date and place of birth: January 21 in New York.

Where I live now: Richmond.

Education: Yale University 1986; Harvard Law School 1989.

Family: Lisa (wife); Morgan, Dominic, Jazmine, Chelsea (children); RJ, Madison, DJ, Ethan, Evan (grandchildren).

The Metropolitan Junior Baseball League (MJBL) is: A non-profit, volunteer-run organization that strives to keep organized baseball available to inner-city youth. It is one of the oldest African American youth baseball leagues.

Assignment: To provide a platform for socially and economically disadvantaged young people to realize their self-esteem through educational, athletic and cultural enrichment programs. MJBL is committed to ensuring that our young people are productive citizens who are prepared for success.

When, where and why founded: The MJBL was founded in Richmond in 1966 after several African American fathers were told their sons could not play in the established youth baseball league because of their race. With the help of several local African American businessmen, these fathers created MJBL so that all children could play organized baseball, regardless of race.

Founder(s): MJBL was founded by Dr. William MT Forrester with support from Caesar Barron and Dr. Philmore Howlette. Dr. Forrester’s son, Bill, is the current executive director.

Importance of MJBL in the world of Little League: MJBL has worked with youth baseball leagues across the country and in the Bahamas to support efforts to keep baseball alive in inner cities and low-income areas.

How I connected with MJBL: I read an article about the MJBL (I believe it was in the Richmond Free Press) and volunteered by calling Bill Forrester.

Why I’m excited about MJBL: I’ve always loved baseball, so I love knowing that the game I love helps our kids and our community. I feel like, in a very small way, we’re working to save baseball in the African American community.

MJBL is a partner of: Major League Baseball, Henrico County, City of Richmond, Richmond Police Athletic League. Frank Thornton, member of the Henrico County Board of Supervisors, was always helpful. Parney and the Flying Squirrels have been one of our biggest partners/supporters since joining.

Ways to get involved with MJBL: We are always looking to train new coaches and assistant coaches. We also need volunteers to help us with administrative tasks to keep the league running. We encourage people to support the children by coming to see a game or two.

MJBL offers: A chance for our children and the African American community to rediscover the magic of baseball and rekindle the passion we once had for the sport.

How to register your child: Visit our website MJBL.org to register online. There is also contact information if you need to talk to someone.

When and where fans can come cheer on the teams: We play games all over Richmond and Henrico, so you can find schedules on MJBL.org. We have several church groups and (fraternities and sororities) that have adopted teams to support. Please contact us if your group would like to adopt a team.

My Favorite Major League Baseball Team: New York food.

Favorite player and why: Jackie Robinson for what he means to African Americans, baseball and America. He had to endure a huge amount of hate. He handled it gracefully and overcame it. Heisaniconandarole model that all Americans can admire.

Little League baseball taught me: The need for teamwork. The rewards of hard work. The pleasure of fiery competition.

Events to come: Our current season is already underway. An MJBL team will represent the United States at the Caribbean Championships for the Bahamas July 7-11. The 31st annual MJBL Downtown Classic will take place August 3-7 in Richmond and Henrico.

A perfect day for me is: Get up early to enjoy a cup of coffee and enjoy the silence of the new day. A day at the beach with the family. End the day with good food and music with family and friends.

What I’m learning about myself during the pandemic: I drive my wife crazy if she doesn’t get regular breaks from me.

Something I love to do that most people would never imagine: Watch corny off-season Christmas movies.

A quote that inspires me: “Ignorance combined with power is the fiercest enemy justice can have.” —James Baldwin.

My friends describe me as: Calm, determined and loyal.

At the top of my to-do list: Find partners to help fund and implement a tutoring/study program for MJBL children.

Best late night snack: Cold pizzas.

Best thing my parents ever taught me: The importance of education and openness to new things to live a full and fulfilling life.

The person who influenced me the most: My parents. They were both great role models and always supported me.

Book that influenced me the most: “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” told to Alex Haley.

What I’m currently reading: Re-read Lerone Bennett Jr.’s “Before the Mayflower” so I can share it with the grandkids.

Next goal: Help make the MJBL Inner-City Classic a truly national tournament.


Source link

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