American culture – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 21:39:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://conservativepetitions.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png American culture – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ 32 32 What Hair Means in Native American Culture https://conservativepetitions.com/what-hair-means-in-native-american-culture/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 15:06:52 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/what-hair-means-in-native-american-culture/ [ad_1] In indigenous cultures, hair has an important role. Different hairstyles can signify important moments in life. For indigenous people, hair is seen as an extension of the self and a connection to the world. Loading Something is loading. Thank you for your registration! Access your favorite topics in a personalized feed on the go. […]]]>

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  • In indigenous cultures, hair has an important role.
  • Different hairstyles can signify important moments in life.
  • For indigenous people, hair is seen as an extension of the self and a connection to the world.

In all cultures around the world, hair has different meanings. In African-American history, as a product of the transatlantic slave trade, braided hair became everything from a means of store and hide food to a way to send secret messages. In ancient Greece, hair length and styles separated people by class and place of origin. And in some indigenous cultures, hair is seen as an extension of the self, as well as a connection to the world.

Wearing long hair or growing hair out is a custom for some native tribes. For some tribes, long hair is synonymous with strength. In others it signifies power and virility. Long hair is also seen by some as an act of rebellion against the colonized world and a representation of indigenous pride.

“People usually start growing their hair when they begin their spiritual journey and reconnect with their culture and tribe,” Bissonette Whisper, an Indigenous hairstylist, told Insider. Whisper is a member of the Oglala Lakota and Anishinaabe Ojibwe tribes, where long hair sometimes represents the honor of a deceased loved one. Whisper said her mother kept her hair long to honor her grandmother’s life.

A link to old and new life

Hair has a deep connection to old and new life across tribes. In Aboriginal culture, a widespread belief it’s that when you cut someone’s hair, they lose a small part of their relationship with themselves. In the Navajo Nation, hair is cut to mourn the death in immediate family. Cropped hair represents time spent with loved ones and new growth represents life after. “In my personal experience, the person who died, whatever it means to you, is how much hair you cut,” Whisper said. In some tribes, cutting hair can signify a traumatic event or a major life change. It could also represent separation from past actions and thoughts, as a way to start over.

There are several other reasons to cut your hair apart from bereavement. In the Apache tribe, haircut ceremonies are held every spring to salute health and success. Meanwhile, the Navajo tribe would cut their children’s hair on their first birthday and let it grow out, uncut, afterward. In some indigenous cultures, cropped hair is considered sacred and is never thrown away. Instead, it is saved or ceremonially burned with sage or sweetgrass.

Aside from long hair, braids are a common style sported by indigenous people, but the reason goes beyond aesthetic purposes or style preferences. “In pretty much every tribe, we all believe that the three strands of a braid represent body, mind, and spirit,” Whisper said, noting that hair connects you to Mother Earth.

Fighting a colonized world

“When indigenous people say we walk in two worlds, which is our world and modern colonization, having long hair means you carry that part of you with you in everything you do,” Whisper said. Her younger brother has been growing his hair for nine years, to honor their grandmother who survived Indian-Catholic boarding school and was forced to cut her hair.

In the middle of the 19th century, off-reserve Indians boarding schools, or boarding schools, were founded to eliminate traditional American Indian lifestyles and replace them with a white, Eurocentric culture. Indigenous children were taken from their families and placed in federally run boarding schools and Christian churches, where they were forced to cut their hair, learn Christianity and give up their traditional clothes, names and even their language. Until 1969, in an effort to “kill the Indian, save the man”, off-reserve boarding schools subjected Native children to sexual abuse, labor exploitation, death and punishments that erupts a long-standing fear of expressing their Aboriginal identity.

Even in modern society, Indigenous peoples still struggle against a colonized world that punishes manifestations of expression, ban feathers on graduation caps to prohibit the wearing of a Traditional Navajo bun at a high school varsity basketball game.

“It comes from the indoctrination of colonization in our society and being forced to cut our hair. We all pretty much carry this trauma from generation to generation of having to cut our hair and have a certain appearance that was never meant for us,” Whisper said. In a culture where hair has been a symbolic ode to identity and spirituality, Indigenous headdress is more than an aesthetic – it’s a sacred preservation of history.


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At The Grace exhibit celebrating Native American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/at-the-grace-exhibit-celebrating-native-american-culture/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 17:16:11 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/at-the-grace-exhibit-celebrating-native-american-culture/ [ad_1] As indicated in an article by the United States Senate, a joint resolution designating November as Native American Month was passed and signed into law in 1990. To honor this designation, The Grace Museum has partnered with Abilene Christian University to create an exhibit celebrating Native American heritage here locally. The commemoration takes off […]]]>

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As indicated in an article by the United States Senate, a joint resolution designating November as Native American Month was passed and signed into law in 1990. To honor this designation, The Grace Museum has partnered with Abilene Christian University to create an exhibit celebrating Native American heritage here locally.

The commemoration takes off today, November 17, at La Grâce from 6 to 7 p.m. with a Native American Dance Showcase. The non-profit association Great Promise for American Indians will feature traditional dances that originated here in the United States, as well as in Mexico, South America and the Caribbean.

ID: Traditional powwow features Native American pageantry

Photo: Getty Images

Dances will include:

  • Men’s grass dance
  • Female jingle dance
  • Fantasy dance for men and boys
  • Women’s Cloth Dance
  • Girl Fancy Shawl Dance

From 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., visitors can make a pictogram in the Grace Museum’s creative lab and enjoy the Native American cultural heritage exhibit in the 3rd floor galleries.

Some of my distant ancestors were Native Americans and I can tell you from my own experiences that it’s an interesting culture. With this local exhibit, you’ll learn about the history of Indigenous peoples right here in the Big Country, as well as in greater Texas.

Quechua women use traditional weaving techniques

Photo: Getty Images

This is a great opportunity, especially during the upcoming holidays, to take the family out for a fun chance to learn some cultural history. The Native American Heritage exhibit runs through November 30 at The Grace, located at 102 Cypress Street in downtown Abilene.

Texas has deep roots in several different cultures. It’s one of the things that makes this great state so unique. Texas also has its share of myths. Check out some regional myths that some Texans actually believe below.

10 Myths About Texas That Even Some Natives Believe

Everything is bigger in Texas, including tall tales! Our condition may seem quite strange to people from afar, or even to our immediate neighbors. There are several myths about Texas that range from bizarre to amusing and downright ignorant and insulting, and even some people born and raised in it believe them. Here are a few that we can dispel today.

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Unspoken rules in American culture and life https://conservativepetitions.com/unspoken-rules-in-american-culture-and-life/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:46:03 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/unspoken-rules-in-american-culture-and-life/ [ad_1] Whether we like to admit it or not, every country – for the most part – has its own set of ~unspoken rules.~ Let me say that as an American I was familiar with many of these rules – but others were quite new to me. So here is even After American rules that […]]]>

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Whether we like to admit it or not, every country – for the most part – has its own set of ~unspoken rules.~

Let me say that as an American I was familiar with many of these rules – but others were quite new to me. So here is even After American rules that some people say are worth knowing if you are planning to visit the United States for the first time or just want to get to know the culture better.

1.

“The South — like South Carolina — may have a reputation for being more hospitable, but there’s often that false nuance. It’s not always as hospitable as it seems.”

nicolasdoremus

2.

“Sales tax varies from country to country, and some states don’t have it at all. Never assume you know what the final price will be. The average across the country is 5%, but in my county it’s 10% – that being said, my state has no income tax.”

norenelee

3.

“School buses are like moving crosswalks. If they have their little stop signs and dangers (although sometimes that doesn’t count) and a little bar comes out in front, you have to stop.”

4.

“Basically you are dealing with 50 different countries somewhat connected by a central authority that manages broad aspects of services and authority. These 50 countries have the ability to determine much of what is or is not legal, appropriate, accepted, and expected within their Be prepared for vastly different laws, customs, and beliefs once you cross what seems be just a line on a map.”

da23v8id34

5.

“When you visit someone’s house for the first time, some people don’t mind you wearing shoes in their house, and others do. It’s best to ask first. If they do want you to take them off, they may or may not provide slippers or house shoes. Wear socks just in case.”

6.

“Be careful how you interact with children who are not related to you. Do not scold or discipline anyone’s child, even if they are acting obnoxious, unless you have explicit permission from the guardian If you see a lost child in a public place, stay nearby and watch or find a police officer or store clerk Do not give gifts or candy to a child alone, and do not not offer to take him anywhere or show him anything Only if there is immediate danger – they just fell into a pond or got into traffic – [do you] act immediately to save the kid!”

pugtato

seven.

“Appetizers and entrees are first courses and an order is generally meant to be shared before the main course, not ordered for oneself or as a meal in itself. But you can certainly do it, and a lot of people do. Entrees are the main course, not the first course or starter.I’ve seen Europeans get a little confused on that one.

8.

“My brother-in-law moved to Japan and his wife and son were born there. When they visited [the US], his wife struggles a lot, and I understand why: American culture normalizes the violation of children’s autonomy. If a baby is in a room, Americans—primarily family and friends—tend or even expect women to treat the baby like an object, pass it around, and see it as a “gift” to give free time to mom. baby, even if the child cries out in protest. In other countries, it’s a total violation.”

annag4cb252ed5

9.

“In most restaurants, if you order tea, it will be iced. And depending on where you are, it can be syrupy.”

pugtato

ten.

“Americans are a touchless society. If you don’t know someone — heck, even if you know someone — just assume even a pat on the shoulder is unwanted. Don’t touch.”

meredithp490fbd99e

11.

“Don’t ask an American a question unless you’re ready to hear the answer.”

12.

“You must tip in the United States. For example, 20%, 15% absolute minimum for all services – unless intentionally below average, but that’s honestly rare because people DEPEND on their tips in the service industry. services in the United States. [servers] are generally not paid a normal minimum wage. It’s often much less than that, like $2 an hour. It’s not just about throwing loose change as a thank you like in other places in the world.”

13.

“It’s a bit of advice from the Great Plains of the Midwest. If you’re going down a dirt or gravel road and find yourself passing another vehicle, give it the ‘rural wave’ – just lift your fingers off the steering wheel to about four inches and give a slight nod. It’s a subtle gesture, not quite a wave, but it’s a gesture that signifies courtesy and a greeting.

14.

“If you are from a country that drives on the left, be sure to look right before crossing and always use the crosswalks! Watch out for turning cars when crossing and don’t take forever to cross. The right on red is legal in some places. Stay out of the left lane on the freeway unless you’re trying to pass someone!”

jennies4783ed5b8

15.

“Americans take hygiene very seriously. Most people shower daily and use deodorant, perfume and cologne. BO is adopted in other countries, but you’ll look dirty here.”

amnat84

16.

“A few rules here. You cannot pump your own gasoline in the states of Oregon and New Jersey. You must wait for attendants. The exception to sales tax is Oregon, where there is no At major freeway entrances where you enter California from other states, there are agricultural checkpoints where they will ask if you are carrying produce. You are supposed to turn it in if you do, but pre-packaged products are usually fine. These checkpoints are not always guarded, however. Or they might wave you through without asking.”

oolong_goddess

17.

“If you are arrested, know your rights.”

myotterlife

Are there any other unspoken rules you could add to this list? Tell me in the comments below!

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The impact of basketball on American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/the-impact-of-basketball-on-american-culture/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 16:47:17 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/the-impact-of-basketball-on-american-culture/ [ad_1] Basketball is one of the most popular sports in America and it has had a huge impact on American culture. The game was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891 and quickly became popular. It is now one of the most popular sports in America, played by people of all ages and bet on […]]]>

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Basketball is one of the most popular sports in America and it has had a huge impact on American culture. The game was invented by Dr. James Naismith in 1891 and quickly became popular. It is now one of the most popular sports in America, played by people of all ages and bet on reputable bookmakers like William Hill, among others. Enjoyably, basketball has brought people from all walks of life together and helped them connect with each other.

How does basketball inspire people of all ages in the American community?

Basketball has always been a popular sport in the United States and continues to inspire people of all ages. For many, basketball is a way to stay active and physically fit. For others, it’s a way to connect with friends and family. And for some it’s a way of expressing their creativity and individuality.

Whatever your reason for playing basketball, the sport can have a positive impact on your life. Basketball can teach important life skills such as teamwork, communication and leadership. It can also help you stay physically active and healthy. And above all, basketball is great fun!

How does basketball promote teamwork and social interaction?

Basketball is a team sport that requires players to work together to be successful. This promotes teamwork and social interaction between players as they need to communicate and cooperate with each other to achieve their goals. Also, things like dribble a basketball require players to have a certain level of fitness, which can also help promote teamwork and social interaction, as players need to motivate and encourage each other to stay fit.

How does basketball unite the American community?

Basketball is one of the most popular sports in America and it has a knack for bringing people together. Whether you’re playing a pick-up game at the park or cheering on your favorite team in a pro game, basketball unites people from all walks of life.

Basketball is a sport accessible to everyone, regardless of background or skill level. It’s a great way to exercise and have fun with friends or family. Whether you’re watching the NBA Finals or playing a game of HORSE with your kids, basketball is a great way to come together as a community.

In conclusion, basketball has had a profound impact on American culture, both in terms of its popularity as a sport and how it has been used to influence social change.

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Supreme Court Challenge to Indian Child Welfare Act Threatens Native American Culture and Survival https://conservativepetitions.com/supreme-court-challenge-to-indian-child-welfare-act-threatens-native-american-culture-and-survival/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 14:35:56 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/supreme-court-challenge-to-indian-child-welfare-act-threatens-native-american-culture-and-survival/ [ad_1] Indian nations in the United States were granted — or imposed upon — American citizenship in 1924, but they are still considered separate nations for many governance purposes. Now, a case before the United States Supreme Court, Haaland v. Brackeen, challenges India’s Child Welfare Act or ICWA. The law was passed by Congress in […]]]>

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Indian nations in the United States were granted — or imposed upon — American citizenship in 1924, but they are still considered separate nations for many governance purposes. Now, a case before the United States Supreme Court, Haaland v. Brackeen, challenges India’s Child Welfare Act or ICWA.

The law was passed by Congress in 1978 after it was discovered that twice as many Indigenous children as non-Indigenous youth were taken from their homes and placed in foster care or put up for adoption. ICWA prioritizes Native American families and tribes in fostering and adoption proceedings involving Native children. Both sides presented their arguments to the Supreme Court on November 9.

Between the lines, Melinda Tuhus spoke with Chase Iron Eyes, lead attorney for the South Dakota-based Lakota People’s Law Project. Here he exposes some of the history surrounding ICWA. As the era of so-called Indian residential schools resembling brutal concentration camps came to an end, many were replaced by a system of foster care and adoption that still resulted in the removal of hundreds of thousands of children. native children from their families and tribes. The Lakota People’s Law Project filed an amicus brief in the case, arguing for ICWA protection.

[Editor’s note: The audio version of this interview was edited to fit broadcasting time-length constraints.]

HUNT THE IRON EYES: This has happened to hundreds of thousands of natives and the purpose was to distance us from the TIWAHAY, the family circle, within which unwritten cultural mores and spiritual ceremonial protocols are passed on to the next generation. That’s what it’s about. ICWA was not born solely from the good judgment and benevolent actions of the US Congress. ICWA is the result of a struggle.

Look: 40 years later, you have states that won’t honor federal law, that won’t honor the right of a Native American tribe – inherent right, God-given right – to determine who their people are, who are its citizens, constituencies, their members and to have that right honored by the states of the union and by American settlers, who seek to adopt these Native American children, whom we regard as the source of our continued ability to determine our own destiny .

It’s a bit of a political reality here. There is a very violent colonial mentality at work here in these states that America now knows. Like South Dakota, for example, Kristi Noem, the current governor, is an Indian fighter; she hates tribal sovereignty. South Dakota takes in about 740 Indian children each year and when they take those children, according to the ICWA, they are supposed to notify the Indian parent and the tribe the child is from. Second, they’re supposed to place the aboriginal child in that child’s family or next of kin. This is option number 1. Option number 2, if they cannot be placed in the family or next of kin, then in the tribe of the child. Option number 3, if they cannot be placed in the child’s tribe, then any tribe or tribe the child may be eligible for enrollment from or may be descended from another tribal nation. We are a very mixed indigenous people. We were everywhere.

MELINDA TUHUS: Chase Iron Eyes, thank you for this story. Now, can you summarize the argument before the Supreme Court?

HUNT THE IRON EYES: The Supreme Court is considering two questions: whether or not the ICWA, a federal law, violates the anti-command doctrine, which says the federal government cannot tell states what to do in certain areas. Now, can the federal government, because of its treaty relationship, because of its trust relationship, demand that Indian identity be protected? We say yes, those of us on this side of the file say yes. Obviously, Texas and the law firm Gibson Dunn say no.

The second question is, is an Indian tribe an indigenous nation, a distinct political entity, or is it a race? Are Indians separate political entities or a race or ethnic minority under U.S. citizenship?

So obviously we say no, we are independent nations that have been forced into a state of dependency and that’s why they call us separate political entities or national dependent nations, which is an oxymoron. But we are not a race of American subjects whose summit of rights ends at civil rights and constitutional rights.

We worked very hard to organize and increase the capacity of the tribal government to create institutions that could accommodate all these children – I mean, if you play devil’s advocate, there is a lack of Indian homes to place the children who enter the Department of Social Services. .

In these colonially oppressed demographics and landscapes, the ills and symptoms of an alien and imposed culture of poverty often lead to broken families. But we were trying very hard to increase that tribal ability.

So Kevin Washburn was the Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs [under the George W. Bush administration]; he came to Rapid City, South Dakota. We had various tribal leaders from the Standing Rock Nation and all the other tribes in the Oceti Sakowin put together and that was the start of our role in writing some of the patches for ICWA.

But no matter what we write and how much we say, that’s how good it should be. What matters is whether the states start honoring the First Americans, the tribal nations, or they keep taking our kids, because our kids are worth a ton of money. We’re talking hundreds of millions of dollars, in federal reimbursements that go from the United States to states like South Dakota that can accommodate that many children. They have a financial incentive to take our children in violation of ICWA.

So, you know, we hope for the best in the Supreme Court, but we also prepare for the worst.

For more information, visit the Lakota People’s Bill at lakotalaw.org, Protecting Indigenous Children at action.lakotalaw.org/native-children-and-families and protect the Indian Child Welfare Act to action.lakotalaw.org/action/protect-icwa.

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4-year-old boy from Minneapolis shares his Native American culture through song and dance https://conservativepetitions.com/4-year-old-boy-from-minneapolis-shares-his-native-american-culture-through-song-and-dance/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:43:49 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/4-year-old-boy-from-minneapolis-shares-his-native-american-culture-through-song-and-dance/ [ad_1] November is Native American Heritage Month and Minnesota is home to 11 tribal nations. A 4-year-old boy from Minneapolis is proud to share his indigenous culture. Opie Day-Bedeau, or “Baby Opie” as he is known on Instagram, has over 65,000 followers. Not only are his videos adorable, but they also teach the lessons of […]]]>

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November is Native American Heritage Month and Minnesota is home to 11 tribal nations.

A 4-year-old boy from Minneapolis is proud to share his indigenous culture. Opie Day-Bedeau, or “Baby Opie” as he is known on Instagram, has over 65,000 followers. Not only are his videos adorable, but they also teach the lessons of his ancestors.

On his father’s side, Day-Bedeau is part of the Bois Forte Band of the Chippewa Nation, a tribe originally from northern Minnesota. On his mother’s side, he is part of the Peepeekisis Cree Nation, an indigenous tribe in southern Canada.

Day-Bedeau’s parents passed on the teachings of their cultures and through song and dance, he carries on these traditions. Her father, Opie Day-Bedeau Sr. is the lead singer of a well-known Native American group, the Midnight Express Singers. He passed on his love of song and dance to his son.

“He came out dancing and singing,” said Desirae Desnomie, Baby Opie’s mother. As soon as he could walk and stand, he held a drum. Song and dance styles Pow Wow and Round Dance came next.

“He always made the hearts of our people close to him beat faster,” said Day-Bedeau Sr. Baby Opie participates in powwows and round dances across the country.

“A lot of people really don’t understand who we are or that we’re still here,” Desnomie said. Her husband’s tribe is indigenous to Minnesota and yet she said so many people are unaware of their culture.

“Even the Minnesota words, where these words come from, they’re indigenous words but we just, for lack of a better term, just butchered the way the language is spoken,” she said.

That’s why this month, Native American Heritage Month is important for their family.

“It’s extremely important,” Desnomie said. “The history of our indigenous people has been through so much and for us to reclaim our culture, our songs, our language, all of our teachings is super important.”

“It’s a way of life for us. It’s not just something we do during the month of November. This is how we live,” added Day-Bedeau Sr., “I wish people knew that as a people we are still here.

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Where Christianity blends with Native American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/where-christianity-blends-with-native-american-culture/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 15:24:37 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/where-christianity-blends-with-native-american-culture/ [ad_1] There are no hard wooden pews when discussing underground theology. Hosted by the Reverend Racquel Gill of Duke Chapel, Minister of Intercultural Engagement, the series creates space to explore faith and underrepresented cultures. Students sit on oversized purple sofas as young children play in the background. Reverend Alex Stayer-Brewington of Westminster Presbyterian Church in […]]]>

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There are no hard wooden pews when discussing underground theology.

Hosted by the Reverend Racquel Gill of Duke Chapel, Minister of Intercultural Engagement, the series creates space to explore faith and underrepresented cultures. Students sit on oversized purple sofas as young children play in the background.

Reverend Alex Stayer-Brewington of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Durham participated in the series’ first discussion on Indigenous theology. Stayer-Brewington is a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina and earned her master’s degree in theology from Duke.

“My belief is that the Christian tradition is much broader, wilder and stranger than its present presentation allows,” Stayer-Brewington said. “And that if we give ourselves permission to express our faith in that way, then I think there can be some very beautiful results.”

Here are some excerpts from the discussion. The next event in the series will take place on November 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the same location: the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity on the top floor of the Bryan Center.

Visit the Underground Theology website for a full list of events.

Rev. Racquel Gill: Who are you? Who are your people? And how does your identity inform your relationship with the divine?

Reverend Alex Stayer-Brewington

“I am a citizen of the Lumbee Nation. We are a community, a tribe that was formed through contact with Europeans when we were driven off the coast into the swamps of what is now Robeson County, North Carolina, currently the poorest county of State. There isn’t a lot of cultivable land, and it’s all cut up with swamps, streams and a very beautiful river from which we take our name.

“We have lost our language. We have lost many aspects of our traditional culture. But over the past 500 years we have developed an extremely strong and beautiful network of traditions, our own way of speaking, eating and worshiping.

“I have lived all my life – but for a year and a half – on or near my ancestral territory. The older I get, the more I realize how special it is. I can relate to animals and interact with the same plants and leave under the same sky as my ancestors.

“Coming into this conversation, I want to say that it’s important to come in with a spirit of humility. I don’t speak for everyone, I certainly don’t speak for all Indigenous nations.

“My community taught me how to be a good parent – ​​come forward and say, ‘What can I contribute? What can I do?’ And then also be the parent who accepts help and assistance.

“The other big lesson is to build a relationship with the land you currently occupy…. Be a little curious about where you are and how you got there.

Rev. Racquel Gill: A place of criticism in many Christian traditions has been around the conversation about ancestral reverence, ancestral connection and community. Why are these connections important to Indigenous peoples?

Reverend Alex Stayer-Brewington:

“Having spent most of my life near my ancestral homeland is to be aware that the land is, literally, the bones of my ancestors. It’s where, for 15,000 years, my people have been. I think that connection and that deep awareness, for me, there’s a lot of competence that comes from that. You feel like you’re in the right place.”

“We talk a lot about the post-apocalypse or what it’s going to be like on the other side of a climate meltdown. But I come from the people who have been through the apocalypse before. We’ve already lost everything: life as we knew it, our language, our relationships with each other. All that is gone. And yet, we are still here.

“If you look at the ministry of Jesus, and you look at the story of Ruth, they are the ancestors of Jesus. You look at the hospitality in this story, you look at the story and you think, “Oh, clearly, Jesus is shaped by the stories told to him about these women and his family.”

“I think once you open your scriptural imagination, which I think is sometimes difficult for us in the West, you start to see more creatively when you look at some of these things.”

Rev. Racquel Gill: I’ll read you a quote: “Native American cultures tend to understand the world in terms of the infusion of the sacred through all of life and all of creation. Growing up, did you experience this infusion of the sacred into all of life and all of creation? Can you share examples?

Reverend Alex Stayer-Brewington:

“No, I haven’t experienced that. As a child, I grew up as a citizen of an occupied country. I grew up under white supremacy and capitalism.

“The only time I really approached this was completely outside of an Indigenous context when I learned to surf when I was in ninth grade. And there was this kind of organized game, where you just spend time and pay attention to the ocean, you learn the rhythm and where you have to position yourself in front of a wave, so that it will carry you and you can get up to experience maybe 30 seconds of fun and then fall back into the water.”

“But looking back now, when I go back to that beach, I realize that I can look at the water and see exactly the same as my great-great-great-great-great-grandfather. dad.”

“Now that changes, doesn’t it? It’s hotter. Some animals die. I don’t know if my daughter will live this experience in the same way as me. But certainly not my granddaughter.

“What I know is that when the Europeans came here, they destroyed a lot of things. And they used Christianity as a tool of destruction. But then we took it and turned it into medicine. And we made it a shelter. And we made a house shape for it.

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Phoenix Suns 22/23 City Edition Uniform: Celebrating Native American Culture https://conservativepetitions.com/phoenix-suns-22-23-city-edition-uniform-celebrating-native-american-culture/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 15:23:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/phoenix-suns-22-23-city-edition-uniform-celebrating-native-american-culture/ [ad_1] Arizona is home to 22 native tribes. From Kaibab Paiute in the North and Pascua Yaqui in the South, from the Navajo, the most populated, to the Tonto Apache, the smallest. The Phoenix Suns, Arizona’s first professional team, and the 22 tribes that have inhabited this region for thousands of years have a common […]]]>

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Arizona is home to 22 native tribes. From Kaibab Paiute in the North and Pascua Yaqui in the South, from the Navajo, the most populated, to the Tonto Apache, the smallest. The Phoenix Suns, Arizona’s first professional team, and the 22 tribes that have inhabited this region for thousands of years have a common respect for family, community and the environment, as well as a common love for the basketball. With the introduction of the Phoenix Suns 2022-23 City Edition uniform, the Phoenix Suns will celebrate Native American cultures and the passion for basketball that unites us.

The turquoise base color of the uniform represents the Stone of Protection or Living Stone, which holds special significance to the native tribes that inhabit Arizona. The Suns primary “Sunburst” logo is centered on the chest of the jersey. The red trim on the jersey represents the color of the land and soil found throughout the state. The side panels feature a traditional staircase motif commonly depicted in regional indigenous art. The side panel is edged with a black ribbon with the direct translation for “the sun” from Arizona’s 22 tribal nations.

The shorts feature the same side panel and black ribbon as the jersey. The belt buckle features a new logo with the PHX wordmark and a basketball surrounded by 22 feathers to represent the tribal nations that call Arizona home. The feathers are colored red, yellow, white and black to align with the traditional “medicine wheel” which is important to Indigenous communities across North America and represents the four directions and cycles of life . While the sash features a pattern and design in line with the sashes worn in the traditional regalia worn by some of the tribal nations in the region. The shorts also feature 22 arrowheads along the hemline, another nod to Arizona’s tribal nations.

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American culture: traditions and customs of the United States https://conservativepetitions.com/american-culture-traditions-and-customs-of-the-united-states-2/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 12:44:48 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/american-culture-traditions-and-customs-of-the-united-states-2/ [ad_1] American Culture encompasses the customs and traditions of the United States. “Culture encompasses religion, foodwhat we wear, how we wear it, our Languagemarriage, music, what we believe to be right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we welcome visitors, how we behave with our loved ones and a million other things,” […]]]>

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American Culture encompasses the customs and traditions of the United States. “Culture encompasses religion, foodwhat we wear, how we wear it, our Languagemarriage, music, what we believe to be right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we welcome visitors, how we behave with our loved ones and a million other things,” said Cristina DeRossi (opens in a new tab)a anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College in London (opens in a new tab).

The United States is the third largest country in the world with a population of over 332 million, according to the United States Census Bureau (opens in a new tab). A child is born every 9 seconds and a person dies every 11 seconds.

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Places to visit to learn about Native American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/places-to-visit-to-learn-about-native-american-culture/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 20:03:40 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/places-to-visit-to-learn-about-native-american-culture/ [ad_1] Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site | North Dakota Tourism in North Dakota Knife River Village was last occupied in 1845 by the Hidatsa and Mandan, and the National Historic Site is home to a beautiful, state-of-the-art museum and interpretive center dedicated to preserving their culture. Today, you can explore the museum on […]]]>

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Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site | North Dakota

Tourism in North Dakota

Knife River Village was last occupied in 1845 by the Hidatsa and Mandan, and the National Historic Site is home to a beautiful, state-of-the-art museum and interpretive center dedicated to preserving their culture. Today, you can explore the museum on site, which is full of Mandan artifacts and artwork created by Plains artists, then take a walking tour of the remains of the village.

Kids will love it: The historic site also has a junior guard programwhere children can explore historical aspects of the village site and earn badges when they complete the program.

On line: nps.gov

Related: 13 children’s books that celebrate Native American cultures and authors

Pueblo Indian Cultural Center | New Mexico

Native American performers in traditional dance attire.

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Native Americans have inhabited the area now known as New Mexico for thousands of years, and their presence is felt throughout the state. This culture is reflected in nearly every aspect of life in Albuquerque, from the city’s art and architecture to its festivals and culinary traditions. This influence extends to the present day among the 23 Native American pueblos, tribes, and nations of New Mexico, ensuring that this way of life lives on.

Kids will love: Children can meet artists selling handicrafts, attend performances and dance lessons, and savor unique contemporary Native dishes at the on-site full-service Indian Pueblo Kitchen restaurant.

On line: indianpueblo.org

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