American culture – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 03:07:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://conservativepetitions.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png American culture – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ 32 32 MLK Park sculpture pays homage to Dr. King and African-American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/mlk-park-sculpture-pays-homage-to-dr-king-and-african-american-culture/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 18:34:05 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/mlk-park-sculpture-pays-homage-to-dr-king-and-african-american-culture/ Spheres of Reflection is the name of the work, created by local artist Kaldric Dow. The 17-foot steel and concrete structure stands at the entrance to the park. SAN ANTONIO – A new sculpture has been installed at Martin Luther King Park on the east side. It honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, […]]]>

Spheres of Reflection is the name of the work, created by local artist Kaldric Dow. The 17-foot steel and concrete structure stands at the entrance to the park.

SAN ANTONIO – A new sculpture has been installed at Martin Luther King Park on the east side. It honors the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as well as African American culture.

Spheres of Reflection is the name of the work, created by local artist Kaldric Dow. The 17-foot steel and concrete structure stands at the entrance to the park, located at 3503 Martin Luther King Drive.

Dow worked with the city to create the sculpture, which is his first piece of public art.

The lower part of the sculpture represents an ambiguous face, which means that it can represent a variety of people and leaves room for interpretation. The top half has reflective spheres to represent natural hair.

Some of the spheres contain words commonly used by Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. Dow said he hopes people will understand and see his work.

The MLK sculpture is finished! It was great working with the San Antonio Arts and Culture Department, Arts and Culture, City …

posted by Kaldric Deshon Dow to Monday, January 3, 2022

“The main thing I want them to do is come up to a sculpture and feel represented … right? And feel this piece here,” he said. at KENS 5. “It is my ultimate happiness as an artist, as a creator.”

Dow worked on art for about a year, he said. He had never created anything in three dimensions before – but he worked with the city as part of the Sketch to Sculpture program to work with manufacturers to bring his vision to life.

Dow, who was born in Houston but lives in San Antonio, studied at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He took informal classes in the studio, which helped him establish a solid drawing, perspective and understanding of art history, he said.

Dow’s work can be found in a myriad of public and private art collections across the United States, and has been seen in numerous exhibitions around the world.

A public inauguration ceremony is scheduled for Tuesday, January 11.



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Remembering Sidney Poitier’s Huge Impact on American Culture https://conservativepetitions.com/remembering-sidney-poitiers-huge-impact-on-american-culture/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 00:37:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/remembering-sidney-poitiers-huge-impact-on-american-culture/ This commentary on the life and legacy of Sidney Poitier was first published in the BAFTA Awards Book 2006, as part of the organization’s award of excellence to the pioneering star, who died on January 6 at the age 94. Is Sidney Poitier the most important actor in American history? One could quickly argue this […]]]>

This commentary on the life and legacy of Sidney Poitier was first published in the BAFTA Awards Book 2006, as part of the organization’s award of excellence to the pioneering star, who died on January 6 at the age 94.

Is Sidney Poitier the most important actor in American history?

One could quickly argue this issue in an affirmative manner simply with news of clips showing heroes like Martin Luther King Jr., Birmingham March on Washington, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, Jackie Robinson and Rosa Parks; Olympians Tommy Smith and John Carlos with their fists in the air in Mexico City in 1968; the rabid segregationists Bull Connor, Lester Maddox and George Wallace; sit-ins and accompanying fire hoses and attacking police dogs; the separate public spaces, the high-profile Ku Klux Klan marches and their discreet lynchings.

For any American film buff who lived through the Civil Rights Revolution of the 1950s and 1960s, the importance of Sidney Poitier’s career cannot be overstated. Poitier is the guy who proved the stupidity of racism film after film – from the early 1950s film “No Way Out” to his role in a popular 1970s comedy series – in theaters and drive-in drives across. America.

Of course, Brando redefined the profession, along with Dean and Clift. Chaplin expanded artistic boundaries and the Duke personified John Ford’s mythical West, but Sidney Poitier redefined America and personified the truth about black America’s quest for equality.

Her gravity and grandeur, her humanity and humility, her relentless struggle for dignity have all had a huge impact on America, forever changing American society and its film industry – and for the better.

His influence was felt most strongly when he took the stage at the Oscars ceremony in 1964. Recognized for his work in Ralph Nelson’s “Lillies of the Field”, he accepted the first actor Oscar ever to be awarded. noir.

If we were to watch this news from that time again, you would see President Lyndon Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 a few months after the Oscars, then we would see the exhumed bodies of murdered civil rights activists Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney a few weeks later.

The times were like that.

The personality of Poitier again marked American culture when Poitier, not smiling this time, gritted his teeth as fictional detective Virgil Tibbs, facing a very Bull Connor-ish Southern cop played by Rod Steiger. He spelled out the sacred rage of an entire race with the line, “They call me Sir Tibbs.

Spot the timeline: It was in Oscar-winning best film “In the Heat of the Night,” which recovered its five statuettes in April 1968, just days after King’s assassination.

Coupé in Poitier, which today remains totally committed to making the world a better place. He’s stepped out of the movie frame and has both feet in the real world.

Honors continue to flow on the way to Poitier, from chivalry to the Oscar of honor. His civic duties also continue, notably as Ambassador of the Bahamas and UNESCO.

Remarkably, given the pressure on Poitier to be “the Jackie Robinson of the cinema”, he did not bow under that impossible cloak. He did not become bilious and strident like many of his contemporaries, who, given the brutal circumstances of this time, can be forgiven for not matching Poitier’s inner strength. Where so many people grew bitter, Poitier became wise and generous. As an accomplished director and producer, he has provided vehicles for a new generation of black actors and filmmakers to prove their creativity and business acumen.

I asked Poitier recently if it was a sign of significant progress that it took less than four years for a black actor, Jamie Foxx, to win the Oscar for Best Actor after it took almost 40 to another, Denzel Washington, to obtain this honor. Poitier chuckled warmly and said, “Well, I guess that proves there aren’t two ways about it.”

Could all this have happened without Poitier’s brilliant and revolutionary career? No guesswork here: there aren’t two ways about it either.


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The River City celebrates African-American culture and heritage https://conservativepetitions.com/the-river-city-celebrates-african-american-culture-and-heritage/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:51:46 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/the-river-city-celebrates-african-american-culture-and-heritage/ JACKSONVILLE, Florida – Christmas may have passed, but the feast which means the first fruits in Swahili is well underway. One of the producers of the Kwanzaa Community Celebration kicked off this year’s vacation at the Ritz Theater and said it was the only public celebration of Kwanzaa in River City. “He celebrates bringing the […]]]>

JACKSONVILLE, Florida – Christmas may have passed, but the feast which means the first fruits in Swahili is well underway.

One of the producers of the Kwanzaa Community Celebration kicked off this year’s vacation at the Ritz Theater and said it was the only public celebration of Kwanzaa in River City.

“He celebrates bringing the community together in a very specific way to solve his own problems and move forward together,” said producer Brenda Frinks.

Kwanzaa was originally created by Dr. Maulana Karenga in the 1960s following riots in order to bring African Americans together by remembering their culture.

This holiday takes place from December 26 to January 1 and during this period, seven principles are reflected:

  • Umoja, which means unity

  • Kujichagulia, which means self-determination

  • Ujima is for collective work and responsibility

  • Ujamaa stands for cooperative economy

  • Nia means goal

  • Kuumba is for creativity

  • Imani is faith

On top of that, there is a traditional tabletop display set up every year with several items of importance including …

“Mazao, meaning the harvests, they symbolize the harvest celebrations around the world,” Frinks said. “There is the Mkeka which is the carpet. It is symbolic of traditions and history. Like I said, the kinara the candle holder. The Muhindi which will be the corn which will be on it and which represents the children.

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In addition to these symbols, there is also the cup of unity, Zawadi – which are homemade gifts from family members, knowledge books, black, green and red candles.

“It is important that we pass on the traditions because as a race of African Americans much of our history was erased when we came to this land,” said Frinks.

Finks said it’s important to celebrate Kwanzaa every year as a re-commitment to African-American ancestry.

“It’s kind of like the resolution where you take time with each of these principles that we mentioned and think about it and give it a little respect,” Finks said. “What happened in the past, what is happening in my life now and what I would like to see in the future.”

The Ritz Theater has been hosting this community celebration for over 25 years, an effort to reconnect African Americans to their homelands.

Frinks describes each principle and its specific purpose in the video below:

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Brenda Frinks, one of the producers of Community Kwanzaa Celebration, reflects the principles of Kwanzaa.

Copyright 2021 by WJXT News4Jax – All rights reserved.


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The State of Christianity in Contemporary American Culture, Part 2 https://conservativepetitions.com/the-state-of-christianity-in-contemporary-american-culture-part-2/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 03:39:13 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/the-state-of-christianity-in-contemporary-american-culture-part-2/ The State of Christianity in Contemporary American Culture, Part 2 Read part 1 of this series By Andy Pope Something is very different in Christianity today from what I observed in my youth. We seem to be very confused as to what is sinful and what is not. Long before the age of 30, when […]]]>

The State of Christianity in Contemporary American Culture, Part 2

Read part 1 of this series

By Andy Pope

Something is very different in Christianity today from what I observed in my youth. We seem to be very confused as to what is sinful and what is not.

Long before the age of 30, when I made a conscious choice to follow Christ, I was exposed to the gospel through the Catholic Church that my mother insisted I be there. assist. As a young boy attending Sunday school, it was pierced in my head that I should not steal, kill or lie. It was not stuck in my head that, for example, homosexuals “were going to hell”.

It was in the 1950s. In general, gays stayed “in the closet”. Like many other taboo subjects, the subject was rarely discussed. But then, in the early 1970s, I saw a massive increase in the number of people who felt free to “go out” and proclaim their identity. The city of San Francisco in 1974 was an astonishing phenomenon. People openly admitted they were gay – and were happy and proud that they did.

It was then that the subject began to be discussed much more openly than ever before. And it was then that the response of conservative Christians was heard.

In fact, it was practically all I heard at the first church I attended. (That, and the issue of abortion.) This brings me to my first observation:

In modern American Christianity, an undue emphasis is placed on certain sins (and so-called sins) to the exclusion of other much larger sins.

If we devoted as much energy to teaching people not to steal as to trying to solve the “gay problem”, we would have a much safer and healthier society.

If we put as much energy into anger management as we did into protesting in front of abortion clinics, we would have a less murderous culture.

And if we really wanted to, we could examine all the lies we exchange in our stories. Such a search for truth could only result in a more honorable nation.

One of the reasons we don’t do these things is that our minds are focused on warfare against those with whom we disagree. It wouldn’t be better if we worked together to resolve the issues that we To do I agree?

This brings me to my second point:

In many cases, it is debatable whether the things that we consider to be sins are actually sins. Some of the things that we think of as sins are conditions, not choices. But in order to sin, you have to make a choice.

Take the example of alcoholism or drug addiction. The words “alcoholism” or “dependence” are not words that refer to choices. These are abstract names that refer to conditions. No condition is a sin. To sin, you have to make a choice.

We all have a condition on this planet that Christians sometimes call “sinful nature.” That is, we all have a tendency to fish. But even the sinful nature is not a sin. This is because it is a condition, not a choice. I did not choose to be born with the sinful nature. What I can to do, in special cases, is to choose not to sin.

In the same way, homosexuality is not a sin. the state homosexuality is something a person is born with. To say that homosexuality is a sin would be to say that I am a sinner because I am Italian. If I lose my temper – my ‘Italian temper’, if you will – then I have sinned. But just being Italian is not a sin. I have no conscious control over this permanent condition.

This is why Paul writes:

“In your anger, do not sin. “ (Ephesians 4:26)

But is it meaningful to say: “In your homosexuality, do not sin? It certainly is. But that doesn’t make any more sense than saying, “In your heterosexuality, don’t sin. We could also substitute “bisexuality”, “demisexuality”, “sapiosexuality”, etc. All of this would be conditions. But when is it guilty to act on any of these conditions?

Like everyone else, I have my own ideas on this. As with any debate, many people from all walks of life would disagree with me, and often between themselves. Why not unite on the points on which we agree and put aside unnecessary debates?

Some choices that are often considered a sin these days are not technically so, according to what the Bible says.

It is not a crime to smoke marijuana in Washington State. The fact of smoking it is not a sin in itself either. This is the case with any legal drug. that’s what we do after put the drug in his system which could be able to be a sinner.

Jesus explicitly states in Mark 7: 14-23 that this is not what is going in our mouths which “defile” us. We are defiled by what is to come out of our mouths. The lies that come out of our mouths are sins. Outbursts of anger towards others are a sin. Hateful comments and name calling are sins. But what you put in your body is not in itself a sin.

Some things that some Christians do today are completely sinners – yet they do not regard them as sins.

Many Christians today have this idea that if none of the Ten Commandments is broken, then it is okay to go ahead and do it. Maybe that’s what was on the minds of the people who stormed the Tri-State sporting goods store last December. There may not be a specific Commandment prohibiting it – at least not among the Ten – but it certainly violates the Golden Rule.

“In all, therefore, do to others what you would have them do to you” (Matthew 7: 12a)

Would the people worshiping in this particular mega-church appreciate it if we all stormed one of their church services with face masks on? Well, maybe they would and maybe they wouldn’t. But personally I wouldn’t do such a thing, because I myself wouldn’t want to be stormed in the same way.

Putting on a mask is not a sin. Invading a business in defiance of store policies is a sin, because it does not love its neighbor. And love – what used to be called “Christian love” – ​​is the fulfillment of the Law.

There is an alarming tendency among some Christians to believe that because they are saved, because they are forgiven, therefore, they have no obligation to obey the laws of the land.

I am a person who believes that unless the law of the land clearly violates the law of God, then we must obey that law. Yet here is a statement that I have heard come out of the mouths of Christians more in the past five years than I have in the past fifty years.

“We did not vote for this law! Therefore, we don’t need to obey it!

Let’s dissect that. I drive and come to a stop sign. Personally, I did not vote on the law that says I must stop at this stop sign. Does that mean I have the right to disobey him? Of course not.

With the question of masks, for example – and considering mask mandates as “laws” – that is to say ordinances – I would have obeyed this law as a good law-abiding citizen, which I was. agree with science or not! It is not my role to dissect the scientific principles that influence legislators. It’s my job to obey the law unless it clearly violates the universal, infallible and immutable law of God.

Now, before I am accused of being a legalist, I need to make a general point:

Jesus Christ died for the sins of mankind and was resurrected so that we could all enjoy eternal life here on earth in fellowship with Him and forever with Him and all the saints in heaven.

In a wholehearted embrace of this awesome truth, what kind of people should we all seek to be? We should be the better the people we can be. (2 Peter 3: 11-18) We should love our neighbors, even our enemies, do good to those who harm us and pray for all those who mistreat us. (And then, as Jesus said, “great will be our reward in heaven.”

But to protest against those who believe differently from ours, and to impose our values, good or bad, on others, is to completely miss the point. We can discuss peripheral issues until the kingdom arrives. But in doing so, we risk missing the Kingdom when it Is it that come.

In the 1960s, the Youngbloods popularized a song called “Get Together”. There were these words:

“Come on people now! Smile at your brother! Everyone get together, try to like each other now!

This song is remembered by many people, but do they know how many of its lyrics refer to biblical passages? The spirit that was alive in the 1960s was not just one of bloody protests, drugs, and widespread sexual abandonment. There was a spirit of love at that time whose fire paralleled the fires that set fire to the buildings in Santa Barbara. And this spirit of goodwill towards one another was once called Christian Love.

“Do not owe anyone anything except to love one another; for one loving the other has fulfilled the Law. For “Thou shalt not commit adultery,” “Thou shalt not kill,” “Thou shalt not steal,” “Thou shalt not covet,” and if there is another commandment, it is summed up in this Word: ” You will love your neighbor as yourself. Love does not harm its neighbor, therefore love is the fulfillment of the law. (Romans 13: 8-10)

So let’s come back to the law of love, and to the spirit that characterized the Sixties, even if in practice, the madness of the Sixties left an imprint too indelible to be erased. Let’s go back to the one Rule which is Golden – for love is the fulfillment of the law.

  • The State of Christianity in Contemporary American Culture, Part 2 – December 29, 2021
  • The State of Christianity in Contemporary American Culture, Part 1 – October 14, 2021
  • A waste of faith – September 24, 2021
  • My experience with prayer – September 2, 2021
  • Did Jesus ever doubt? – July 17, 2021
  • Two types of people in this world – May 27, 2021
  • Finding meaning in the pandemic – May 6, 2021
  • Inequalities in our perception of homelessness, part 5 – March 17, 2021
  • Inequalities in our perception of homelessness, part 4 – March 10, 2021
  • Inequalities in our perception of homelessness, part 3 – March 3, 2021

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Cape Cod’s Squaw Island sparks debate over Native American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/cape-cods-squaw-island-sparks-debate-over-native-american-culture/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 09:03:06 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/cape-cods-squaw-island-sparks-debate-over-native-american-culture/ HYANNISPORT – For centuries the lush, Hyannisport Marsh Green Arrow was referred to locally as Squaw Island, with legends surrounding a “squaw” or Wampanoag woman, who awaited her husband’s return from the war on the island. Corn US Home Secretary Deb Haaland recently designated the word “squaw” as a racial insult and decided to ban […]]]>

HYANNISPORT – For centuries the lush, Hyannisport Marsh Green Arrow was referred to locally as Squaw Island, with legends surrounding a “squaw” or Wampanoag woman, who awaited her husband’s return from the war on the island.

Corn US Home Secretary Deb Haaland recently designated the word “squaw” as a racial insult and decided to ban the word on federal lands. Haaland, a registered citizen of the Pueblo of Laguna Native American tribe in New Mexico, is the first Native American to hold a Cabinet position.

Along with the designation of Haaland, there is the creation of a task force that will assess 650 locations and rename the streams, valleys, lakes, streams, road signs and parks across the country that contain the word “squaw” including Squaw Island in Hyannisport.

But Camille Madison, from Wopanâak language recovery project in Mashpee, said the designation is a call to “look at history” and “reconnect with the origins of the Algonquian language”.

“Squaw is a word or what’s called a morpheme – a significant morphological unit of a language. It refers to the female character of a woman and is used to create words that mean woman, or little girl, or good girl, ”said Madison, who is a member of the Wampanoag tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah). “I want to respect that people feel offended by the use of this word. Western tribes did not know it was a morpheme in our language. But what does this tell us as the Algonquin people? This (Haaland’s designation) contributes to and perpetuates our erasure. It is part of my sacred language. This is who I am.


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Web3 Boom Brings America’s Culture Wars to the Tech Industry https://conservativepetitions.com/web3-boom-brings-americas-culture-wars-to-the-tech-industry/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 08:30:10 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/web3-boom-brings-americas-culture-wars-to-the-tech-industry/ The Web3 movement and cryptocurrencies are causing a disruption in the software industry. Insiders fear the debate is now more about political values ​​than technology, leading to polarization. They say if compromise becomes impossible, Web3 will never improve, which hurts innovation. If you’ve spent any time online in the past year or so, you probably […]]]>
  • The Web3 movement and cryptocurrencies are causing a disruption in the software industry.
  • Insiders fear the debate is now more about political values ​​than technology, leading to polarization.
  • They say if compromise becomes impossible, Web3 will never improve, which hurts innovation.

If you’ve spent any time online in the past year or so, you probably haven’t been able to escape the hype around cryptocurrencies, NFTs, and the so-called Web3 in general. Celebrities like Reese witherspoon and Gwyneth Paltrow have jumped on the bandwagon, and El Salvador has recently become the first country to give bitcoin legal tender status.

The backlash is just as inevitable. NFT projects like Lindsay Lohan and Stan Lee’s Estate were greeted with ridicule and vitriol. Word that Kickstarter planned to pivot its crowdfunding platform to be blockchain-backed has been received by many on social networks with disappointment and even disgust.

Fans of Web3 believe cryptocurrencies and NFTs are harbingers of a tech movement that can decentralize finance and commerce, putting more power in the hands of users and disrupting Google and Facebook. Skeptics believe the benefits of Web3 are unproven or unrealistic as cryptocurrency scams multiply and blockchains harm the environment by their electricity consumption.

Now tech industry insiders say the cryptocurrency debate is coming home as developers increasingly take sides on Web3. Twitter is full of Anecdotal evidence of developers quitting when their employers embrace crypto, even though executives from companies like Amazon and Facebook accept new jobs in the industry. Even leaders like Elon musk and Jack Dorsey – vocal bitcoin and crypto fans – were pushed back after suggesting Web3 was overrated.

Importantly, insiders say, this growing divide has as much to do with politics as it does with technology, with interest or skepticism in cryptocurrency being seen as a value statement that can pit a developer against it. peers.

It’s a real bigger risk, some insiders say.

The more polarized the discussion becomes and the more people who identify strongly with pro or anti-crypto camps, the harder it is to have an honest dialogue in the industry about the promise of the technology – and to be reckoned with. the harms of the rising tide of crypto scams and other bad behavior on the blockchain.

Some fear this division will be disastrous for technology in the long run. If the Web3 movement avoids even mild or well-reasoned skepticism, insiders say, the dangers will only worsen, escalating with its growth. And they say conversely, if Web3 skeptics are unwilling to assess the technology on its own merits in good faith, the industry could risk throwing out the proverbial baby with the bathwater.

“If it’s going to be bad then we have to know what it is to be able to play defense,” said Kelsey Hightower, senior engineer at Google. “If it’s going to be good, then we have to know how it works so that we can actually step into the action or play it. But we can’t have any of these options from a place of ignorance.”

Web3 has become a polarizing issue

Bitter debates are common in the tech industry, where developers will endlessly discuss the merits of Mac versus PC, or Android versus iPhone, or even whether to put a tab or a space after each new line of. coded.

What sets the crypto debate apart is that the cryptocurrency itself is a increasingly political question in a way that doesn’t cleanly break along party lines. Hillary Clinton, the former Democratic presidential candidate and secretary of state, has described what she sees as the dangers of bitcoin, while Republican Senator Cynthia Lummis walked across the aisle to work with Democratic Senator Ron Wyden to propose new tax rules around cryptocurrency.

Some in tech worry that this will bring the intense polarization that saturates American politics at the heart of the software industry, making any good faith discussion on the subject difficult.

“It’s so polarizing,” said Tracy King, software engineer at startup Xplor. King said that by adding “.eth” to his Twitter display name, signifying its support for the ethereum blockchain, requested a surprising amount of flashback. “I saw people who I thought were friends start insulting and blocking me for being a ‘Web3 shill’,” she said.

Kelly Vaughn, a leading software developer and co-founder of gift card startup Govalo, experienced similar fallout after tweeting about her interest in learning more about Web3. “I know I have a large following and that always brings people with strong opinions on either side of the fence, but I certainly didn’t expect a backlash from the start,” Vaughn said. .

“I feel like everything is getting so politicized here,” Anne Griffin, product manager at travel booking site Priceline, told Insider. “It puts people at a disadvantage to get into technology that will change the world, like very early on. “

On the flip side, even optimistic cryptocurrency skeptics are reluctant to voice anything like dissent, some insiders say. Liz Fong-Jones, a developer well known for her employee activism at Google, said she was concerned about losing potential customers or future investors by criticizing crypto.

“The instant you mention something negative about cryptocurrency, there will immediately be people nitpicking what you have to say,” Fong-Jones told Insider. “I wouldn’t necessarily characterize the behavior as blatantly harassing as much as it sucks oxygen into the room.”

Anil Dash, CEO of collaborative coding platform Glitch, said that while the pro-crypto camp doesn’t take concerns about environmental damage, scams, hoaxes and other dangers and risks that have accompanied the boom seriously. Web3, it ‘It will be all the more difficult to bridge the gap.

“The Web3 community didn’t have this moment to realize that it had empowered not only crooks and crooks, but also the people who were going to hijack this technology for truly malicious use,” Dash said. “For all the good that it has done, there has been so much harm. And so I think there is anxiety, grief and residual guilt about it.”



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Native American culture should be part of Bison World https://conservativepetitions.com/native-american-culture-should-be-part-of-bison-world/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 13:05:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/native-american-culture-should-be-part-of-bison-world/ I am referring to the Jamestown Sun article “Bison World Designed for All Ages” from December 4 to 5: I am delighted that investors and project planners are actively interested in bringing attention to tourism in Jamestown, North Dakota. I moved to Jamestown from the East Coast in 1978. I was hoping to see the […]]]>

I am referring to the Jamestown Sun article “Bison World Designed for All Ages” from December 4 to 5:

I am delighted that investors and project planners are actively interested in bringing attention to tourism in Jamestown, North Dakota.

I moved to Jamestown from the East Coast in 1978. I was hoping to see the old presentation and culture of the Wild West and Native Americans. For the most part, I’ve seen western clothing and rodeos, and our wonderful Frontier Village. It left me feeling that part of our old west was missing.

Many tourists will come to our wonderful city and enjoy the fun activities of Bison World. How wonderful it would be for them to get a taste of Native American culture with the old west of Frontier Village.

The Bison World design is a nod to our Native Americans with a presentation on the big screen. Personally, I believe that many travelers and tourists would like to experience a true presentation of an indigenous village and give the indigenous people the opportunity to display and sell their wares. Many would like to see performances of Aboriginal life and perhaps their music, culture and dance. I would love to experience the pride of our Native Americans in a live presentation here in Jamestown instead of seeing them on a screen.

Newsletter subscription for email alerts

Here we are on the eve of the year 2022, unfortunately, Native Americans will only have a nod to their history on the big screen.

I think many would agree with me. I would love to hear from you.

Thank you for this opportunity to express my opinion.


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Joan Didion: Revered Writer Who Chronicle American Culture https://conservativepetitions.com/joan-didion-revered-writer-who-chronicle-american-culture/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 19:58:37 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/joan-didion-revered-writer-who-chronicle-american-culture/ Joan Didion, a virtuoso prose stylist who for more than four decades explored the restless and fractured state of the American psyche in her novels, essays, reviews and memoirs, and who, as one of the “new Journalists’ of the 1960s and 1970s, helped non-fiction reporting gain status as an art form, has died at the […]]]>

Joan Didion, a virtuoso prose stylist who for more than four decades explored the restless and fractured state of the American psyche in her novels, essays, reviews and memoirs, and who, as one of the “new Journalists’ of the 1960s and 1970s, helped non-fiction reporting gain status as an art form, has died at the age of 87.

With an unwavering eye and a keen intellect, Didion revealed an America in the throes of moral decay and self-deception, its citizens enslaved to false narratives that offered little explanation for how the world worked.

His strong opinions, often against the grain, on subjects as varied as the films of Woody Allen and the circulation in Los Angeles, were matched only one precise style and almost universally admired.

Many of his early works – the classic essay collections Collapse towards Bethlehem (1968) and The white album (1979) – chronicled the grim realities of mid-century California. Rather, in this sun-drenched land of fun and opportunity, America seemed to be falling apart, atomized by greed and amorality.

Didion argued “that the Norman Rockwell version of America was a convenient illusion, and if you look closely, we live in a time when fear, anxiety, isolation and loneliness were our laws. commons, ”said Martin Kaplan, professor of entertainment. , media and society at the University of Southern California, in a 2015 interview.

In her later years, Didion became known for her unbiased memoirs on death and bereavement. In The year of magical thinking (2005), she followed the elliptical, death-denying thought patterns that dominated her life after the sudden loss of her husband, John Gregory Dunne, to a heart attack at home, when he and Didion had just returned home. of a visit to their daughter in hospital.

“Long before what I was writing started to be published,” Didion wrote at the beginning of the book, “I developed the feeling that the meaning itself lay in the rhythms of words, sentences and paragraphs, a technique for holding back everything I thought or believed behind an increasingly impenetrable polish. Yet, she continued, “this is a case where I need more than words to find meaning This is a case in which I need whatever I think or believe is penetrable, if only for myself.

The book has sold over a million copies, won the National Book Award, and was adapted by Didion into a well-received Broadway play with her friend Vanessa Redgrave. Its success was clouded by the death of Didion’s daughter, Quintana Roo Dunne, shortly after its publication.

Speaking at an event in California in 1977

(Getty)

Like Tom Wolfe and Truman Capote, Didion was one of the few writers of his time to be immediately recognizable by the general public thanks to their cultivation of an off-page mystique. Photographed for Time magazine shortly after the publication of slumped, she looked like a paragon of cold blood, posing in front of her yellow Corvette Stingray with a cigarette in her hand.

She remained a fashion icon until late in life, pictured for a Celine commercial in 2015 with her bobbed hair and eyes obscured by a pair of large, dark sunglasses. Yet she also explored her physical frailty, writing about her frequent migraines and revealing, in the title essay of The white album, that she had gone blind for six weeks due to an illness diagnosed as multiple sclerosis and that she had enrolled in a psychiatric clinic.

Didion and Dunne, another novelist, largely funded their literary work by writing and editing Hollywood screenplays. Set in the Hollywood social whirlwind of the 1970s, the couple hosted and partied with stars such as Warren Beatty and The Mamas and the Papas, and were among Hollywood’s highest paid screenwriters.

Their films included A star is born (1976), with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson as rising and declining rock singers, respectively; and True confessions (1981), starring Robert De Niro and Robert Duvall in an adaptation of Dunne’s Los Angeles detective story.

Didion herself often denigrated screenwriting, which she said The Parisian review was “no writing” but “notes for the director”.

The other handwriting she wrote, the ‘real’ handwriting in her essays and books, was essential to her life. “If I had been fortunate enough to have even limited access to my own mind, there would have been no point in writing,” she said in a lecture and essay titled “Why I write “. “I write entirely to find out what I’m thinking, what I’m looking at, what I see and what it means.”

At Berkeley in April 1981

(Getty)

Joan Didion was born on December 5, 1934 to a fourth generation California family. His father sold insurance and later became a real estate speculator; her mother, Didion later wrote, was a socialite who “” gave tea “the way other mothers breathed.”

Traveling across the country with her father, who worked as a finance officer in the Air Force during WWII, she made it a habit almost her entire life to take her notebook with her wherever she went. she walked on, stealthily recording snatches of dialogue from whispering adults behind closed doors or recovering in military hospitals.

Shortly before graduating from the University of California at Berkeley in 1956, Didion won a Vogue magazine competition for young writers. Choose between the two competition prizes, a trip to Paris or a job at Vogue, she decided she would try her luck in the magazine’s New York offices.

At the same time, she wrote for publications including National exam, The nation and Saturday evening mail. Whether it’s praising the work ethic of a sick and aging John Wayne or, later, offering a scathing review of Woody Allen and the “fake adults” in films such as Manhattan and Interiors, she has forged a reputation as an independent critic, fiercely concerned with authenticity.

Didion (right) with Dunne and their daughter in Malibu in 1976

(Getty)

In 1964 she married Dunne, who worked as an editor at Time. They quickly left for Hollywood, where Dunne’s older brother Dominick worked as a film producer and was able to introduce them to studio executives across the city.

Cradled by alcohol and their common ambition to be great writers, their marriage was tumultuous in his early years, which Didion did not hesitate to incorporate into his work. When in 1969 she received a regular column in Life, she started her first play this way, describing a family trip to Hawaii: “We’re here on this island in the middle of the Pacific instead of asking for a divorce.” Dunne, as he always has, edited the story.

Their daughter, Quintana Roo, was born in 1966 and was quickly adopted by Didion and her husband, who gave her the name of a state on the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula. They returned to New York in 1988, taking an apartment on the Upper East Side, where Didion lived until his death.

Barry Goldwater’s Republican for much of the 1960s, Didion gradually became disillusioned with the party during Ronald Reagan’s tenure as governor of California. Encouraged by Robert Silvers, Editor-in-Chief of The New York Book Review, she increasingly focused on the theater, and the hypocrisy of American politics, in non-fiction books such as Salvador (1983), on the involvement of the United States in the civil war in El Salvador, Miami (1987), on the Cuban immigrant community in this city, and the collection of essays After Henri (1992).

The press was a frequent target in his work, with Washington post journalist Bob Woodward repeating some of his harshest criticisms in a 1996 essay, included in his collection Political fictions (2001), who described his post-Watergate report as mere shorthand for the country’s political elite.

His political work, as well as his more personal writings in books such as Where i came from (2003), a blend of memories and Californian history, was guided by a concern for “storytelling”. Stories, she says, allow us to make sense of our lives and our world – although it is not uncommon for these stories to be myths; heartwarming fictions susceptible to cracking.

“We tell each other stories for a living,” Didion wrote in the title essay of The white album. She adds: “We live entirely, especially if we are writers, from the imposition of a narrative line on disparate images,” ideas “with which we have learned to freeze the moving phantasmagoria which is our real experience. Or at least we do it for a while.

Joan Didion, journalist and author, born December 5, 1934, died December 23, 2021

© The Washington Post


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Kwanzaa celebrates African American culture from December 26 to January 1 https://conservativepetitions.com/kwanzaa-celebrates-african-american-culture-from-december-26-to-january-1/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 11:12:45 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/kwanzaa-celebrates-african-american-culture-from-december-26-to-january-1/ Kwanzaa’s Great Columbus community celebration is moving this year from the King Arts Complex, which is undergoing renovations, to the Ohio History Center. The seven-day celebration will begin on December 26. The local event will run from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. each day and is a joint effort between the Ohio History Connection and […]]]>

Kwanzaa’s Great Columbus community celebration is moving this year from the King Arts Complex, which is undergoing renovations, to the Ohio History Center.

The seven-day celebration will begin on December 26. The local event will run from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. each day and is a joint effort between the Ohio History Connection and Tawi Family Village.

“Tawi Family Village has had a citywide Kwanzaa event for many years,” said Lyn Logan-Grimes, African American history experience developer at the Ohio History Connection. “So I approached them this year to host it here at the Ohio History Connection, which is a first for us. It’s really exciting.

One of the main organizers of the event is Phyllis Ransom, who holds the eldest position with Tawi Family Village.


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American culture: traditions and customs of the United States https://conservativepetitions.com/american-culture-traditions-and-customs-of-the-united-states/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 15:47:25 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/american-culture-traditions-and-customs-of-the-united-states/ American culture encompasses the customs and traditions of the United States. “Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we think is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors , how we behave with our loved ones, and a million other […]]]>

American culture encompasses the customs and traditions of the United States. “Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we think is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors , how we behave with our loved ones, and a million other things, “said Cristina De Rossi, anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College in London.

The United States is the third largest country in the world with a population of over 332 million, according to the United States Census Bureau. A child is born every 9 seconds and a person dies every 11 seconds.


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