Governor Hochul Celebrates India’s 75th Independence Anniversary With Native Americans — The Indian Panorama

Governor Kathy Hochul delivers remarks during India’s Independence Day celebration at Flushing Meadows in New York, August 16

Pledges to continue to officially proclaim August 15e like india independence day

FLUSHING, NY (TIP): New York Governor Kathy Hochul celebrated with the Native American community and elected officials on the 75e India’s Independence Day at the Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows on 16 August. Addressing a large gathering of American Indians and elected officials, Governor Hochul praised the enormous contribution of the American Indian community in America. “On behalf of myself and the people of New York, I am here to declare that the strength of New York is the diversity of our people. Much of this is rooted in India and we have a long tradition. Therefore, I will continue to officially proclaim August 15, 2022 as India’s Independence Day,” Hochul said. Here is the full text of Governor Hochul’s remarks. “In the United States, we stand firm with this same shared understanding of what it is to reject colonial rule, to embrace democracy and to promote our common democratic values ​​of inclusion, pluralistic equality, freedom expression and, of course, freedom of religion. . So these are the values ​​that unite us. India, the United States of America, it is shared, and we have learned from each other. “We are here to celebrate India’s Independence Day. I know you know this, but I also know that this is a chance for us to recognize the incredible diversity of our city as a whole. And our state , and the many contributions of the Native American community here. And we are so fortunate here in New York to have so many American Indians representing our levels of government. There are many firsts, and for the community that has long been under -represented in our society, these barriers have been broken es. And so, they make incredible contributions to our civic life.

“So I want to thank again, as I mentioned, the American Indian pioneers in this room. We are proud that nearly 400,000 American Indians live in New York. More than half of them are in New York. New York State, they’re spread all over from my hometown upstate to this borough of Queens. But most of them are right here in New York. And these are leaders, doctors, scientists, engineers, businessmen, lawyers, artists, writers, restaurateurs, merchants. They really create this beautiful fabric and so many contributions. It really makes New York fabulous and so vibrant.

“And as I mentioned, we are thinking of the pandemic, of so many Indian American healthcare professionals, from doctors to frontline nurses. They showed up, they showed courage, they were there and we needed them and they literally saved lives. So let’s recognize them too. And of course you keep us well fed with amazing food. I have to admit – I’m happy to admit it, I have a husband who lives far away. He lives across the state. I see him on weekends and every time I come home he gets Indian food to take away because he knows it makes me happy. We have delicious food, and we break bread together and always think about the importance of this culture. “Plus it gives us a chance to reflect on history, a chance to talk and celebrate the celebrations of life, but also the struggle. The journey to America had many hardships and many returned as far back as the 1800s, with American Indians discovering this world, but it wasn’t really until a century later that America got rid of of these national origin quotas, and we were really able to open the doors. You know, the quotas in place until the sixties. So the real opportunities came in the 70s, 80s, and 90s. And that’s why we’re so excited to see so many new, new Americans coming here from India. And also, we just don’t celebrate the American Dream, so people turned to the American Dream. Many came here, like my grandparents, who left great poverty on a small island called Ireland. And they had to leave. Their parents told them that there was no life for you here, that we couldn’t afford to literally feed you, and that they had to come to this country. So, as many have come here looking for, yes, the American dream, but that’s what I call the New York dream. It’s even sweeter. It’s more beautiful. It’s more diverse.

“And that community, the Indian community, has become such an important part of that fabric. And as Governor, I carry this diversity with great pride. I have attended many Diwali celebrations and India Republic Day celebrations, but I am very proud to be the first Governor of New York State to officially celebrate the independence of India. Very first. And so, this marks 75 years since India broke free from colonial yellow and people were able to start on this path to true democracy. And as I mentioned from the start, it was difficult. And I don’t think the history books correctly tell the story of over a million deaths and the forced displacement of over 12 million people. It was the largest mass migration in modern history at the time. And we’re not talking about that. We are not talking about the pain and loss endured to create the greatest democracy in the world. So, I know that for some, the wounds are still fresh. You know, the realization of what their parents and grandparents had to go through to have this elusive concept known as freedom and democracy, but they never stop persevering and fighting. “And in the United States, we stand firm with this same shared understanding of what it is to reject colonial rule, to embrace democracy, and to promote our common democratic values ​​of inclusion, pluralistic equality, freedom of expression and, of course, freedom of religion. So those are the values ​​that unite us. India, the United States of America, it’s shared, and we learned from each other. We also learned by celebrating the many languages ​​and religions, countless, almost too many to count the number of religions spoken by the 1.2 billion people. But it’s also just a statement of a community rising up, d a rising world.

“And leaders who inspired others like Gandhi and Nehru. I mean, these are names that we learn in our schools about what struggle means and about the peaceful embrace of democracy, what it is all about. Non-violence and these are words we still talk about today. Dr. King frequently quoted those great Indian leaders who inspired him to learn about nonviolence.

“So that’s what we appreciate here today. We celebrate that, our people, our values, our democracies, and whether the journey started in 1776 as America from the United States, or in 1947, the The road to building a democracy has always been a long and difficult one, and we are striving to make it a more perfect union democracy. And we know what lies ahead. The great opportunity to say this is a place, c is a place where people have congregated and they bring their beautiful languages, religion, culture, music, parties. And because of that, I can’t imagine what New York State would be like, New York City without it. It’s a cornerstone.” What I embrace and cherish as governor of this incredibly diverse state, and the American Indians who found their way here and made us still better than we would have been. I celebrate this today. So, I continue to celebrate that. We have the opportunity to break bread together, to talk about our common commitment to rebuilding the state. Even in the aftermath of a pandemic, it has hit us hard, but I know that by firing as one people now, as one people united and in love with democracy, we will continue to do great things. And so, thank you for being here. I say, Glory to India, Jai Hind. “And also, let’s celebrate by remembering our consul general. And I want to give him a proclamation. Consul General Jaiswal, on behalf of myself and the people of New York, I am here to declare that the strength of New York is the diversity of our people. Much of this is rooted in India and we have a long tradition. Therefore, I will continue to officially proclaim August 15, 2022 as India’s Independence Day. Indian Consul General Randhir Jaiswal, who was present with consulate officials, also delivered remarks on the occasion.


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