Midterm elections 2022 | Richmond Free Press

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The battle for Congress remains unresolved, with vote counting still underway in many states and a final determination whether Democrats or Republicans secure a majority in one or both chambers potentially still weeks away.

As of Wednesday, the results of Senate races in Arizona, Georgia and Nevada and 53 home races in various states were still unknown, according to The New York Times and other election results tracking websites.

What is clear from the results in Virginia and across the country, the red tide that was supposed to give Republicans control of the US House and US Senate has not materialized, according to a wide range of analysts. .

This is a big win for President Biden. According to election data, first-term presidents with low approval ratings typically see their party lose 20-40 House seats and 5-10 Senate seats, but this year Republicans look likely to have gains much weaker, if they win at all.

The Old Dominion, where counts are practically made, is an example of this. Republicans entered the election with high hopes of winning three House seats held by Democrats.

Instead, Republicans won just one seat, following Republican state Senator Jen Kiggans’ loss to Democratic incumbent Elaine Luria in Virginia Beach’s anchored 2nd congressional district. .

With preliminary votes showing 291,000 votes cast, Senator Kiggans, a former Navy pilot and nurse practitioner, was the choice of 52% of voters and Rep. Luria, a former Navy commander, the choice of 48% .

In Richmond and elsewhere in the state, the other six Democratic incumbents and four Republican incumbents retained their seats. That includes Democratic 7th District Rep. Abigail Spanberger, who won 52% of the vote and fended off a determined challenge from Donald Trump-backed Republican Yesli Vega, a Prince William County supervisor who said before the vote that God had ordained his victory.

As expected, the two black members of the Virginia delegation were re-elected.

Fourth District Representative A. Donald McEachin, 61, won 65% of the vote in the Richmond-Petersburg area to easily win a new game with his Republican challenger, Reverend Leon Benjamin, and secure his fourth two-year term. .

Rae Cousins ​​campaigns for Congressional incumbent A. Donald McEachin on the 800 block of 31st Street near Church Hill on Tuesday.

In a statement, Rep. McEachin thanked voters for “their trust in me” and pledged to remain dedicated and vigilant in the fight for Virginian priorities and values. “I will continue to work every day for a stronger economy, well-paying jobs and a lower cost of living. I will fight for women’s reproductive rights, human rights, reasonable gun safety laws, the protection of our democracy, and the preservation of our planet.

Meanwhile, in the 3rd congressional district, Democratic Rep. Robert C. “Bobby” Scott, 75, of Newport News, won his 16th term. He won 67% of the vote to defeat his young Republican challenger, Terry Namkung.

Much of the post-election focus is on the U.S. Senate, which is the big prize, as which party holds the majority has major influence over nominations for the federal bench and other federal positions. .

Prior to the election, the Senate was split 50-50, with Democratic Vice President Kamala Harris allowing her party to hold a majority in the event of a tie.

On Wednesday, with the unofficial results of most of the 35 races known, the Democrats and their two independent allies looked likely to control 48 seats and the Republicans 49 seats, with three races pending.

Democratic incumbent Mark Kelly continues to lead in Arizona, Democratic incumbent Senator Catherine Cortez Masto trails in Nevada, and Democratic incumbent Senator Ralph Warnock heads for a runoff election on Tuesday, Dec. 6, with the Republican

challenger Herschel Walker to decide the winner from Georgia.

As for the 435-member House, the end result is still evolving. Democrats entered the election with 222 House seats to Republicans’ 212 and three vacancies. A majority requires 218 seats.

By the Free Press deadline, 206 House seats had been called for Republicans and 176 had been called for Democrats.

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