african americans – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 20:36:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://conservativepetitions.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile.png african americans – Conservative Petitions http://conservativepetitions.com/ 32 32 Dr. Peter Hayden of Turning Point recognized for his leadership in the African-American community | News https://conservativepetitions.com/dr-peter-hayden-of-turning-point-recognized-for-his-leadership-in-the-african-american-community-news/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 05:27:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/dr-peter-hayden-of-turning-point-recognized-for-his-leadership-in-the-african-american-community-news/ Peter Hayden, PhD, founded Turning Point, Inc. in 1976 with a vision to help African Americans struggling with the disease of addiction. Forty-six years later, the Minneapolis organization has served more than 24,000 people. In recognition of these and other accomplishments, Turning Point was recently awarded the inaugural award “Diversity, Inclusiveness and Racial Equity Award” […]]]>

Peter Hayden, PhD, founded Turning Point, Inc. in 1976 with a vision to help African Americans struggling with the disease of addiction. Forty-six years later, the Minneapolis organization has served more than 24,000 people. In recognition of these and other accomplishments, Turning Point was recently awarded the inaugural award Diversity, Inclusiveness and Racial Equity Award of the National Association of Drug Treatment Providers (NAATP). The award now bears Hayden’s name.

“It’s such an honor to be recognized in this way,” Hayden said. “When I initiated my own recovery from addiction, I never imagined getting a doctorate or creating something like Turning Point that would last so long and impact so many people. For me, it was always about of our customers and our wonderful team at Turning Point, so I share this humble acknowledgment with all of them. It means even more to know that this award will serve to inspire and recognize others who do great work in helping people from historically underrepresented and marginalized backgrounds.

With a guiding mission to provide treatment for substance use disorders and other key support services to help people achieve wellness and live independent lifestyles, Turning Point is an African- which provides culturally appropriate substance use disorder treatment, housing, support services and training. to adults. In 2015, the University of Minnesota identified Turning Point’s approach to culturally specific treatment for African Americans as an industry best practice. Turning Point also regularly collaborates with the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, a well-known national care system, to share knowledge, tools, and best practices and enhance both organizations’ abilities to provide quality, accessible care to a greater number of persons.

“With communities of color experiencing significant disparities in access to quality, culturally competent care, as well as addiction outcomes, organizations like Turning Point and leaders like Dr. Hayden are critical to the nation, no only because of the direct care they provide, but because of the experience they have to share with the rest of healthcare,” said Dr. Joseph Lee, President and CEO of the Hazelden Foundation. Betty Ford. “In Minnesota, for example, African Americans are twice as likely as white residents to experience a drug overdose. We have a lot of work to do collectively to change that, and I am grateful for Dr. Hayden’s leadership and partnership, and delighted that this honor will continue to elevate important voices and organizations like his in the years to come.

NAATP presented Hayden and Turning Point with its first Diversity, Inclusiveness and Racial Equity Award at a national conference late last year, and announced this month that, at the future, the award will bear his name. Nominations for the “Dr. The Peter Hayden Award for Diversity, Inclusiveness and Racial Equity” is now open. Criteria for the award – which honors individuals or organizations that have made diversity, inclusivity and equity a priority in clinical and operational practice – include diversity among staff, leadership and governance; organization-wide and community-based training initiatives (eg, anti-racism, gender inclusion, social justice); implementing culturally appropriate clinical or recovery support programs; and demonstrating or advocating for equitable access to services for communities that have faced exclusion or marginalization.

“Dr. Hayden’s leadership and community-centered approach has had a monumental impact not only on Turning Point programming and clients, but also on professionals across the country who see him as a leader and source inspiration for the work they do,” said NAATP CEO Marvin Ventrell. “Turning Point’s local efforts are a model of best practice in treating culturally specific substance use disorders, and we look forward to honoring Dr. Hayden’s vital legacy for years to come.

This year, “Dr. Peter Hayden Award for Diversity, Inclusiveness and Racial Equity” will be presented at the NAATP National Conference being held May 7-9 in San Diego.


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The uniqueness of American culture https://conservativepetitions.com/the-uniqueness-of-american-culture/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 13:32:12 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/the-uniqueness-of-american-culture/ By Richard D. LandChristian Post editor | Friday 04 March 2022 A daughter poses for her father as they tour the Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island as it reopens to the public in New York, July 4, 2013. | (Photo: REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz) At the risk of inflicting cruel and unusual punishment on CP readers, […]]]>
A daughter poses for her father as they tour the Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island as it reopens to the public in New York, July 4, 2013. |

At the risk of inflicting cruel and unusual punishment on CP readers, I’ll give you a brief insight into how my mind “works” sometimes. Please remember that I have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). If they had had Ritalin when I was a kid (when the earth’s crust was young), they would have marinated me in it.

Anyway, I was working on the first draft of a column on “How words are weapons in any battle requiring persuasion in the public square”.

I paused to sift through a pile of newspaper clippings that I had “filed” to be kept or discarded later. While doing so, I came across an article that immediately made me say, “Teaching moment! Learning time!”

So, I immediately decided to postpone the scheduled column to go with this one! It’s here.

As I was leafing through a old copy of The New York Times, the following quote from a French Muslim caught my attention: “It is only abroad that I am French. I am French, I am married to a Frenchwoman. I speak French, I live French, I love French cuisine and culture. But in my country, I am not French.

Clearly, there has been a growing wave of emigration from France by French men and women who are children of non-French (mainly Muslim) immigrant heritage in recent years.

This phenomenon illustrates a point that I have sought to make many times. The United States of America is a unique society in that it is not established and based on soil or ethnicity, but on an all-encompassing idea that “all men are created equal” and that “they are endowed by their Creator” with “the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This ideal, and allegiance to it, are the social cement that binds us together. In France and in most countries of the world, a society is formed and maintained by its common ethnicity and experience. Many of these mostly white-collar French emigrants have settled permanently, many in the United States, where they feel much more accepted.

I said many times that I could take all the steps to become a French citizen and learn the French language and customs, but I would still never be fully accepted as “French”.

Yet someone perhaps of Korean descent and ancestry can immigrate to the United States, learn English and become a citizen, learn our history, embrace our ideals, and become fully American in a much deeper sense. or I could never become “French.”

I was first personally aware of this profound difference when I was a doctoral student at the University of Oxford in Great Britain (1972-75). It was a time of deep political tension and turmoil in the UK as the end of socialist Britain was on its tottering last legs, soon to be replaced by Thatcherism. And yet, while they would go on relentlessly and vehemently, they still had their common heritage and experience as Englishmen to hold them together.

A humorous experience during my first year there helped reinforce that message. In my ignorance, I mistakenly thought at the time that “British” and “English” were synonymous terms that could be used interchangeably. In conversation with my advisor/teacher from Oxford, who was very English, I made the mistake of describing the great American writer and emigrant to Britain, TS Eliot, as English. My tutor immediately replied, “Oh no, my dear boy, you can become British, you have to be born English!”

For an American like me, it was really strange feelings. Anyone can become an American in every sense of the word I, whose family on both sides arrived on these shores before 1700, am an American, as long as you embrace and swear allegiance to our founding ideals.

And at the same time, while embracing America, people of other cultures and ethnicities can cherish their original ethnic identity with pride and gratitude, as evidenced by the millions of African Americans, Chinese Americans, German Americans, Hispanic Americans, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, Japanese Americans, and Vietnamese Americans, etc. have done and will continue to do so.

By making common cause in cherishing our American ideals, without abandoning their own ethnic traditions, they have and will continue to enrich the multi-hued tapestry of our common culture in many important ways.

This welcoming attitude toward newcomers who embrace American ideals extends to even the strongest regional American traditions. I’m a sixth-generation Texan, and no one is more proud of their traditions than Texans. Yet with a steady influx of newcomers to the state over the past few decades, the most popular bumper sticker year after year in the state is, “I wasn’t born here, but I came here as soon as possible!” In other words, Texans applaud the good taste of those who move to Texas and welcome them as “Texans.”

We have all benefited from the diverse cultural, musical, linguistic and culinary contributions that each ethnic group has made to the great mosaic that is America.

Reading about the sad fate of French emigrants, I was once again so grateful that in God’s providence I was born and raised in this great and unique country. I also couldn’t help but think of Dr King and his enormous contribution to all of us in articulating the vision of a country where we are not judged by the color of our skin, but rather by the content of our character.

As President Theodore Roosevelt said a little over a century ago, America has plenty of room and acceptance for immigrants who come here for a better life for themselves and their families as long as their main goal was to be “American”. TR wanted to make sure the emphasis was in the right place – i.e. African American, Anglo American, Irish American, Italian American, etc.

Let us all consider our patriotic duty to help our dear country to live up to the ideals contained in our founding acts. This American vision and dream for all men and women is noble and deserves our devotion and our duty.

PS My heart breaks when I see the apparent martyrdom of Ukraine in its pursuit of what began as the American dream that has universal application. I recognize the “spirit of 1776” when I see it, and it is bravely displayed in Ukraine right now as free men and women stand against the savage tyranny of Russia. Please join me in praying for our Ukrainian brothers and sisters and their families.

Dr. Richard Land, BA (Princeton, magna cum laude); D.Phil. (Oxford); Th.M (New Orleans Seminary). Dr. Land served as President of Southern Evangelical Seminary from July 2013 to July 2021. Upon his retirement, he was honored as President Emeritus and continues to serve as Adjunct Professor of Theology and Ethics. Dr. Land previously served as Chairman of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention (1988-2013) where he was also honored as Chairman Emeritus upon his retirement. Dr Land has also been an editor and columnist for The Christian Post since 2011.

Dr. Land explores many current and critical topics in his daily radio report, “Bringing Every Thought Captive”, and in his weekly column for CP.


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Columbia Salon Owner Expresses the Importance of Hair in African-American Culture | Central Missouri News https://conservativepetitions.com/columbia-salon-owner-expresses-the-importance-of-hair-in-african-american-culture-central-missouri-news/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/columbia-salon-owner-expresses-the-importance-of-hair-in-african-american-culture-central-missouri-news/ COLUMBIA — Columbia hair salon owner Bridget Williams says hair is an important part of self-identity. “I think it’s important because it gives you the confidence and the boldness to go out into the world and be confident. If you don’t feel good about your hair, you tend to be more intimidated, a little more […]]]>

COLUMBIA — Columbia hair salon owner Bridget Williams says hair is an important part of self-identity.

“I think it’s important because it gives you the confidence and the boldness to go out into the world and be confident. If you don’t feel good about your hair, you tend to be more intimidated, a little more anxious. You’re not confident,” Bridget Williams said.

House Bill 1743 “would prohibit certain discriminatory practices on the basis of hair texture and protective hairstyles”. The bill is sponsored by Rep. Shamed Dogan (R-Ballwin).

Dogan said the bill would enter third reading on Thursday or early next week. So far, the bill has received bipartisan support.

“It’s a big part of people’s identity, their personal identity, their cultural identity as African Americans and it’s something very important to people in our culture because it’s a way to express who you are,” Dogan said.

Bridget Williams owns Art fair, and she has over 20 years of experience in the beauty industry. When she started, there were no teachers in her school who taught how to cut and work with African American hair.

“Because at that time, there weren’t many African Americans coming through the school, and there were no teachers. So there wasn’t a lot of education based on African American hair,” Bridget Williams said.






The art fair is located at 701 Big Bear Blvd.



Bridget Williams said she personally has never experienced hair discrimination, but she said she is aware that hair culture is often discriminated against.

“I’ve definitely followed hair culture and seen many ways where people are discriminated against based on how they choose to wear their hair,” Bridgett Williams said. “I think it’s so unfortunate because who are you to tell a person how they, how their hair is growing out of their head is that good or bad? You know, so I really feel like that, you know, I’m really happy to see something being done about it.”

Bridget Williams has said she believes there has always been discrimination in black hair culture.

She said she believed the House bill was important, but “sad that the discrimination is taking place in the first place.” She said it can affect how someone feels about themselves and their self-confidence.

“If that’s what comes to mind, who are you to tell me that’s unprofessional, fair or acceptable, that’s who I am,” Bridgett Williams said.

Bridget Williams stressed that people should be allowed to be themselves and express themselves as they see fit, especially hair.

“So I’m very happy to see something happening at the state and government level that can change that,” Bridget Williams said. “I think it’s a little sad that we even have to go. You know, I think it’s just a little sad that we even have to have things like that in place just to protect ourselves, in the way that we were created, but we are advancing.”

She said she strives to create a community environment in her living room, where people can feel comfortable. She said she also strives to maintain a professional atmosphere and fight stigma.

“I think in our culture it’s kind of a stigma when you come into the salon community, you’re there forever, and people gossip, and it’s not that place of professionalism, and I have feel like I’m really trying to change the perception of what black hair salons are,” Bridget Williams said.

In her 20 years, Bridget said she had more than 100 clients. She said friendships are what she values ​​the most and her identity comes from her clients.

“I’m able to express my artistic ability with the hairstyle that I put on my clients,” said Bridget Williams. “When you can choose when your hair looks good, you feel good. You’re bold, you’re confident. You’re ready to take on the world. So it gives you a sense of self, confidence and worth.

Katina Williams is a first client after her daughter recommended the Artistry salon. Katina Williams said hair is about personal identity.

“My hair gives me confidence. After being successful today, I will feel better, so I do my job better, because I look good,” said Katina Williams.

Katrina Williams said she learned to take care of her hair from an early age. Now she comes to the salon because she said taking care of her natural hair was too much work.

“There’s a lot in there. I just couldn’t keep treating my natural hair and making it look good,” Katina Williams said, as Bridget fixed her hair extensions on Wednesday.

The Missouri House gave initial approval for the bill on Monday. If the bill is approved in a future vote, it will be transmitted to the Senate.


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Vaccination Reluctance in the Black and African American Community | News https://conservativepetitions.com/vaccination-reluctance-in-the-black-and-african-american-community-news/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 02:17:00 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/vaccination-reluctance-in-the-black-and-african-american-community-news/ WASHINGTON — Misinformation and history have caused concern among Black and African-American communities in Washington during the pandemic, the Washington State Department of Health is trying to spread the information differently. As of February 14, 2022, 72% of Washingtonians ages 5 and older are fully vaccinated, within the black and African American population, only 4% […]]]>

WASHINGTON — Misinformation and history have caused concern among Black and African-American communities in Washington during the pandemic, the Washington State Department of Health is trying to spread the information differently.

As of February 14, 2022, 72% of Washingtonians ages 5 and older are fully vaccinated, within the black and African American population, only 4% are fully vaccinated.









“And a lot of that stems from the historical disparities that we all know, going back to the 1920s with the Tuskegee Syphilis Study,” said Chauné Fitzgerald, CEO and founder of Women of Wisdom in Tri-cities.

The CDC and the United States Public Health Services conducted a study from 1932 to 1972 of about 400 African American men with syphilis. This study aimed to document the effects of untreated syphilis on black men in the rural south, but it was deemed “ethically unjustified” because the men were never informed of the life-threatening consequences the treatments could have on them.

In a class action lawsuit on behalf of the men in the study, the court found that participants had no choice but to leave the study when penicillin became available as a treatment and cure for syphilis. Study participants and their families reached a $10 million settlement in 1974.

“Time is enough, we are all human beings and we want the same quality of life, the same quality of health care as everyone else,” Fitzgerald said.

She said the Tuskegee Syphilis Study had a huge impact on the distrust of black and African-American communities towards health care.

“The story goes that when it turns out that you are 3/5 of a person or a man and you are not considered a full human being, it often stems from how people treat you and the type of quality care you receive,” Fitzgerald said.

That’s why the Washington State Department of Health launched the “Here for Us” campaign.

“With the COVID vaccine in particular, many communities have been kind of bombarded with a lot of misinformation and misinformation,” said Remeka Jones, acting director of the community relations and equity team at the business hub. from the Washington State Department of Health. . “It is natural for people to have general concerns about the safety and ethics of any type of medical product under development.”

The DOH wanted to bring information to African-American communities in Washington, asking community members to talk about their experiences.

“This campaign was designed by African Americans for African Americans to help dispel the misinformation I mentioned earlier that we believe has contributed to low vaccination rates,” Jones said.

Fitzgerald, who recently became a collaborative thinking partner with the DOH, said they have tried to give resources to people who are hesitant.

“They want to make sure they reach out to the black community so we don’t get left behind,” Fitzgerald said.

The Department of Health hopes the campaign will give more voice to those who are hesitant about the vaccine and provide accurate information to minority communities.







Free pop-up vaccination clinic




Women of Wisdom will be hosting a free COVID-19 vaccination clinic on February 25, 2022 at DERMACARE DERMAHEALTH in Richland.


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Japanese-American Community Uses 80th Anniversary of FDR Executive Order 9066 to Talk About Black Reparations https://conservativepetitions.com/japanese-american-community-uses-80th-anniversary-of-fdr-executive-order-9066-to-talk-about-black-reparations/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 01:42:03 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/japanese-american-community-uses-80th-anniversary-of-fdr-executive-order-9066-to-talk-about-black-reparations/ SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — It’s been 80 years since President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that incarcerated 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Decades later, the Japanese-American community promises to never forget the atrocities and who helped them obtain reparations. February 19, 1942 is a day that will forever live in infamy […]]]>
SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — It’s been 80 years since President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that incarcerated 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II. Decades later, the Japanese-American community promises to never forget the atrocities and who helped them obtain reparations.

February 19, 1942 is a day that will forever live in infamy – a step down in America’s ugly past of hatred, bigotry and xenophobia.

“It’s a story that unfortunately not everyone knows yet,” said David Inoue, executive director of the Japanese American Citizens League.

That day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. It called for the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry.

VIDEO: Japanese Americans reflect on WWII concentration camps and racism today

The vast majority were US citizens.

The order was in response to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the catalyst for America’s entry into World War II.

In the months that followed, the racist hysteria came to a head over fears of another possible Japanese surprise attack.

“It’s a really dark chapter in America’s history of systemic racism that incarcerated my dad, my mom, and all of my aunts and uncles,” said documentary filmmaker Jon Osaki.

His latest release, “Reparations”, will be screened at Films du Souvenir 2022 on the weekend of February 26 and 27.

The 11th annual Films of Remembrance will be held virtually.

If you’re on the ABC7 News app, click here to watch live

For Osaki, Memorial Day is personal.

He shared photos with ABC7 News of his father while he was incarcerated at the Tule Lake Relocation Center just outside the California-Oregon border.

His father was sent along with thousands of other Japanese Americans in 1942.

In many cases, they were uprooted from their homes with few possessions and forced to live in inhumane conditions.

Tanforan Racetrack in San Bruno on the San Francisco Peninsula was used as a detention center.

American citizens of Japanese ancestry were forced to sleep in stables.

80 years later, Japanese Americans swear never to forget.

“It is also a way of healing and remembrance for community members who experienced the injustice of mass incarceration during World War II,” Inoue said.

VIDEO: Asian Americans in the news tell how microaggressions affect self-identity

After years of lobbying under the veil of multiracial solidarity, the US government apologized to Japanese Americans in 1988 with the passage of the Civil Liberties Act signed by President Reagan.

And with that apology came $20,000 reparations to surviving Japanese Americans.

“Our families received reparations for the incarceration of our entire community during World War II,” Osaki said. “Many of us feel a certain responsibility to speak out against other injustices that have yet to be righted.”

Today, the San Francisco-based filmmaker uses his voice to once again call for multiracial solidarity – this time for African Americans to receive reparations for the country’s original sin of slavery and decades of Jim Crow.

“Japanese-American communities across the country are holding these events and many of them are talking about the topic of reparations for black people. They’re using this as an opportunity to raise awareness,” Osaki said.

San Francisco attorney Don Tamaki knows the job well.

He serves on the first California Reparations Task Force established by AB 3121 and signed into law by Governor Newsom.

VIDEO: California Reparations Task Force Tackles Racial Wealth Gap

Tamaki is the only non-black member of the nine-person task force charged with studying historical harms and recommending potential remedies for African Americans in California.

“As Japanese Americans, we know something about prejudice,” Tamaki said.

“As we celebrate February 19 to remember our community, we remember that each time America has recognized its wrongs, righted them, and become more inclusive, it has grown stronger as a nation.”

As California’s Reparations Task Force prepares to release the first of two reports on its findings on historic harm to the African-American community, the movement is gaining support from a familiar ally.

“I believe we can make the greatest strides together in addressing systemic racism in this country,” Osaki said.

The Japanese American Citizens League holds events across the country on Memorial Day.

Many events remain virtual due to COVID.

Copyright © 2022 KGO-TV. All rights reserved.


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Personality: Michelle Evans-Oliver | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-michelle-evans-oliver-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 23:04:12 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-michelle-evans-oliver-richmond-free-press/ Amid a pandemic marked by death, large-scale action and change for African Americans, Michelle Evans-Oliver is working to ensure the stories of Black people in Richmond are preserved and promoted. As founder and president of the Richmond, Virginia branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Ms. Evans-Oliver began this […]]]>

Amid a pandemic marked by death, large-scale action and change for African Americans, Michelle Evans-Oliver is working to ensure the stories of Black people in Richmond are preserved and promoted.

As founder and president of the Richmond, Virginia branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Ms. Evans-Oliver began this work when the group was formed in 2020.

“We want to tell our story about what’s really going on,” says Ms Evans-Oliver. “We don’t walk, we don’t walk, but we ensure that our information is communicated, documented and that we know exactly who we are and where we come from.”

Pursuing this mission carries a personal connection for Ms. Evans-Oliver. She is a descendant of Dr. Carter G. Woodson, a Buckingham County-born historian and author known as the “Father of Black History.” He created ASALH in 1915 with several co-founders and launched Black History Week in 1926, which was later recognized as Black History Month.

The ancestral connection led Ms Evans-Oliver to attend the ASALH National Convention in Richmond in 2016, where organizers sought to meet the descendants of Mr Woodson. There, Mrs. Evans-Oliver would not only gain a better understanding of ASALH, but also receive requests each year after the convention to open a branch in Richmond.

“Why not?” said Mrs. Evans-Oliver of her choice to start the group. “I know it’s a lot of work, but aren’t all organizations starting from scratch?”

The main objective of the organization for 2022 is to increase the number of its members. The process so far has been a mix of good and bad, with the pandemic limiting events to virtual talks and seminars and causing the branch’s initial registration to drop by 65 members.

However, the virtual events have allowed the branch to create a network of interested people extending far beyond Richmond and Virginia.

Future plans for Richmond ASALH include expanding their partnerships with the Greater Richmond Chapter of the African American Historical and Genealogical Society, of which Ms. Evans-Oliver is also Vice President, AARP Virginia and the Virginia Museum of History and Culture.

What’s important, she says, is for people to learn about Black life and history and ensure its preservation and proliferation for future generations.

“My goal is simply to spread awareness about ASALH, so that people can join us,” says Ms. Evans-Oliver. “We are looking for members who are willing not only to listen, but also to do the work.

Meet a local leader in the preservation of black history and this week’s personality, Michelle Evans-Oliver:

Volunteer position #1: President of the Richmond, Virginia branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, or ASALH.

Other community involvement: Vice President of the Greater Richmond Chapter of the African American Historical and Genealogical Society.

Occupation: Business analyst and financial advisor.

Date and place of birth: August 11 in Richmond.

Where I live now: County of Henrico.

Education: Bachelor of Marketing, Minor in Advertising, Virginia State University.

Family: Daughter, Lauren, and son, Evan.

ASALH is: An organization dedicated to the study and appreciation of African American history.

Date and place of creation: ASALH was founded on September 9, 1915 in Chicago.

The founders of ASALH: Dr. Carter Godwin Woodson, as well as George Cleveland Hall, James E. Stamps, William B. Hartgrove and Alexander Louis Jackson.

Mission: ASALH’s mission is to promote, research, preserve, interpret and disseminate information about black life, history and culture to the global community.

How Carter G. Woodson continues to be relevant today: Dr. Woodson continues to be relevant today being known as the “Father of Black History” and the creator of Black History Month. He also started the movement of telling our true story and debunking misinformation about African Americans, giving us credibility we never had before.

ASALH and Black History Month: Black History Month was launched as Black History Week in 1926. Dr. Woodson chose the month of February to encompass the birthdays of two great Americans who played leading roles in the elaboration of black history, namely Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, whose birthdays are the 12th and 14th, respectively. In 1976, President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month.

National theme for Black History Month 2022: Black health and well-being.

Number of ASALH chapters: There are 46 branches in the United States and three chapters in Virginia – the Heritage of Our Ancestors branch in Richmond, Virginia, the Hampton Roads branch and the Louisa County branch.

When the Richmond ASALH branch was founded: In 2019, we had our meeting of interest. We were chartered in 2020.

Local Founder: Michelle Evans-Oliver.

How I became interested in establishing a local chapter: In 2016, ASALH held its national convention here in Richmond. A friend of mine said they were looking for Dr. Woodson’s descendants. I went to the convention and talked to the organizers, and learned more about ASALH. Every year after convention I was asked to start a branch in Richmond, which never had a branch.

Goal or Project #1 for ASALH Richmond Branch: To increase membership.

Strategy to achieve the objectives: Staying active in the community despite the pandemic by doing educational programs via Zoom on various topics related to African American history in Virginia and across the country.

How to become a member of the ASALH Richmond branch: Richmond ASALH has an online membership form at https://forms.gle/8kZb7pP22MtEffnf7 Also, find out about us on our Facebook page (@ASALHRVA) or email us at asalhrvainfo@gmail.com.

Richmond ASALH is a partner of: We partner with Virginia Museum of History and Culture, AARP Virginia, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society to name a few. We seek to partner with other organizations that match our mission.

The next ASALH events:

ASALH Richmond is hosting several free virtual events with co-sponsor AARP Virginia. The first “Africulture – Crops, Benefits and Way of Life – The Story Between Plants and Africa”, is a virtual lecture by Michael Carter Jr., a fifth generation farmer on his family’s farm in County of ‘Orange, Va., at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 2. 22. Mr. Carter is the Small Farm Resource Coordinator for the Small Farm Outreach Program at Virginia State University. He will talk about his work in Ghana, Kenya and Israel as an agronomist and organic farming consultant and the history between plants and Africa. Register at https://aarp.cventevents.com/CultivateFEB

On Wednesday, February 23, ASALH Richmond will host Wind Down Wednesday – Hidden History with Brian Bullock, a local filmmaker and history buff at 7 p.m. The virtual event includes a short film about your family’s history, followed by a discussion with Virginia historians. and genealogists. The event is free and co-sponsored by AARP Virginia. Register at https://aarp.cventevents.com/WindDown4

On Sunday, February 27 at 5 p.m., ASALH Richmond will host a “Sunday Sit-In: Racial and Social Injustice!” with Dr. Shelley Murphy, historian and researcher in the Descendant Program at the University of Virginia. She will talk about her research and interviews on the correlation between lynching and Confederate monuments. The free conference is co-sponsored by AARP Virginia. Register at https://aarp.cventevents.com/SundaySitInFeb

A perfect day for me is: Relaxation and cooking.

What I’m learning about myself during the pandemic: I learned that some days should be rest days. I learned to slow down and relax. I am learning to prioritize my schedule.

Something I love to do that most people would never imagine: Watch documentaries. Inspirational quote: “When people show you who they are, believe them the first time.” —Maya Angelou

My friends describe me as: Motivated and fun

At the top of my to-do list: Find more of my ancestors. Best Late-Night Snack: Skinny Pop Lime Popcorn.

Best thing my parents ever taught me: Be a good steward of my finances.

The people who have influenced me the most: My mother and my father.

Book that influenced me the most: “The 48 Laws of Power” by Robert Greene.

What I’m currently reading: “The Laws of Success” by Napoleon Hill.

Next goal: FYI – I was selected as a local hero by AARP National to be featured in their 2022 Black History Month marketing campaign. I and 14 others from across the country were nominated and selected from a large number of candidates.


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Nonprofit organization sheds light on health care disparities in African American community https://conservativepetitions.com/nonprofit-organization-sheds-light-on-health-care-disparities-in-african-american-community/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 01:33:18 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/nonprofit-organization-sheds-light-on-health-care-disparities-in-african-american-community/ RICHMOND, Va. — A Virginia mother and her nonprofit hope to continue the conversation about health disparities among African Americans and find solutions. Tanisha Tyler-Graves lost her son to epilepsy two years ago and says her experience with the healthcare system reinforces her belief that health disparities exist and need to be addressed. Experts say […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va. — A Virginia mother and her nonprofit hope to continue the conversation about health disparities among African Americans and find solutions.

Tanisha Tyler-Graves lost her son to epilepsy two years ago and says her experience with the healthcare system reinforces her belief that health disparities exist and need to be addressed. Experts say health disparities can mean earlier deaths when patients struggle with chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, stroke and heart disease.

Many factors contribute to disparities among African Americans, including education, employment, income, and various lifestyle factors.

Tyler-Graves’ nonprofit When The Trumpet Sounds, along with Virginia Organizing, Crescent Solutions and health experts from Norfolk State University will explore these questions at an upcoming Forum of the Month. of black history titled Solutions to Minority Health Disparities.

“When my son was going through what he was going through, I didn’t understand a lot of things, so I had to start educating and researching on my own. Now if we can have a team of us, good leaders, we can begin to dismantle disparities at all levels. We fail because of lack of knowledge,” said Tyler-Graves.

The Solutions to Minority Health Disparities forum is virtual and everyone is invited. The free event will take place on February 12 at 10 a.m., but you must register online.


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Disdain for the people | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/disdain-for-the-people-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 23:24:33 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/disdain-for-the-people-richmond-free-press/ We are gravely concerned by the growing contempt that the Youngkin administration and its GOP and Democratic supporters have for the people of the Commonwealth. On Tuesday, the state Senate passed an amendment that would ban school mask mandates. The vote: 29-9. Ten of 21 Senate Democrats joined Republicans in endorsing the amendment, which would […]]]>

We are gravely concerned by the growing contempt that the Youngkin administration and its GOP and Democratic supporters have for the people of the Commonwealth.

On Tuesday, the state Senate passed an amendment that would ban school mask mandates.

The vote: 29-9.

Ten of 21 Senate Democrats joined Republicans in endorsing the amendment, which would give parents the right to choose whether their children will wear masks at school. The amendment was sponsored by Democratic Senator Chap Petersen of Fairfax, which was added to a bill sponsored by Republican Senator Siobhan S. Dunnavant of Henrico requiring public schools to conduct in-person classes.

Senator Petersen told reporters on Tuesday that he agreed with Governor Youngkin’s decision that masks should be optional in schools, but that it should be enshrined in law and not just an executive order issued by the governor last month on his first day in office. .

Then on Wednesday, the amended bill passed the Senate by a vote of 21 to 17, with fewer Democrats ultimately supporting the bill in its final passage. However, the measure is likely to become state law because the House of Delegates, which will now consider the measure, is controlled by Republicans.

It’s a new low for our state and for the Democrats who control the 40-member Senate. By making masks optional, lawmakers are jeopardizing the health and safety of our students, teachers and staff.

The COVID-19 pandemic is not over. Check the numbers. Nationally, the death toll from the virus and its latest highly transmissible omicron variant has exceeded 903,000. In Virginia, more than 17,300 lives have been claimed.

Health officials are now raising concerns about BA.2, the new “stealth” variant of omicron that may be heading our way. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health professionals emphasize that the best ways for people to protect themselves and their loved ones from the virus and its potential long-term effects are to wear a mask and to get vaccinated.

According to the latest statistics, 1 in 5 people tested for COVID-19 in the state are positive. While those numbers have slipped from the state’s recent 35% positivity rate, lifting a mask mandate may leave millions of Virginians unprotected when they need it most.

For state lawmakers to join those like Governor Youngkin in shunning science in the name of parental rights and personal freedom signals a disregard for human life and a failure to protect our most vulnerable. This is particularly serious for African Americans and other people of color who continue to be disproportionately affected by the virus, in terms of deaths and number of cases.

We applaud Richmond Senator Jennifer L. McClellan for standing with eight other Democratic senators and voting against Senator Petersen’s amendment. She was joined in opposition by her Virginia Legislative Black Caucus colleagues, Senator L. Louise Lucas of Portsmouth and Senator Mamie Locke of Hampton, who also voted against the final version of the bill on Wednesday.

Sen. Joseph “Joe” Morrissey and Sen. Ghazala F. Hashmi, both Democrats who represent parts of Richmond, voted for the optional mask amendment, along with Sen. Lionell Spruill of Chesapeake, a VLBC member.

On Wednesday, Sen. Morrissey voted for final passage of the bill, while Sen. Hashmi and Sen. Spruill voted against.

This legislative ploy simply adds to the confusion that arose from Governor Youngkin’s Jan. 15 executive order banning school systems from enforcing mask mandates in the classroom. The issue is being debated in court, where several lawsuits have been filed.

A September poll by Virginia Commonwealth University’s L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs found a majority of Virginians — 71% — support mask mandates in K-12 public schools. .

It was no surprise that the poll also showed a deep divide on the issue between Republicans and Democrats as well as minorities and whites in the state.

According to the poll, 94% of Democrats supported the last administration’s mask mandate in public schools, compared with 43% of respondents who identified as Republicans. Additionally, 83% of minority and Hispanic respondents favored the mandate, compared to 64% of non-Hispanic white Virginians.

This raises the question of whether Democratic lawmakers who oppose the mask ban are countering the values ​​espoused by their constituents.

The health and safety of our loved ones is of the utmost importance during this pandemic. Voters will remember that.


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Personality: Lawrence ‘Larry’ Clark | Richmond Free Press https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-lawrence-larry-clark-richmond-free-press/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 23:04:12 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/personality-lawrence-larry-clark-richmond-free-press/ The history of African Americans remains obscure because of the effects of slavery and white supremacy. It is this lack of information that Lawrence “Larry” Clark seeks to address as president of the Greater Richmond chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society. First elected in 2019, Mr. Clark is charged with leading the chapter’s […]]]>

The history of African Americans remains obscure because of the effects of slavery and white supremacy. It is this lack of information that Lawrence “Larry” Clark seeks to address as president of the Greater Richmond chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society.

First elected in 2019, Mr. Clark is charged with leading the chapter’s mission to bring to the public the knowledge, sense of discovery and self-awareness that he himself has experienced in genealogical studies in a city and state filled with the untold stories he seeks. to unveil.

“Richmond is central to the history of African Americans in the United States,” says Clark. “Yet throughout this history of racist activity in Richmond, our African-American ancestors were able to survive.

“With genealogical studies, we can learn more about the survival of our ancestors, and we can pass those learnings on to future generations.”

Mr. Clark cites his late wife Patricia’s interest in exploring his own family history as the spark that “ignited the genealogy bug” in him. The two were among many founders of AAHGS in Richmond in 2010.

“Since joining AAHGS, I’ve learned a wealth of information about my ancestry and African-American family history in general,” Clark says. “I am better informed about how our ancestors lived and, more importantly, how they survived slavery, wars and Jim Crow laws.”

Seeking to expand access to genealogy in the Richmond area, Mr. Clark is working to grow the chapter’s membership, improve its use of technology and expand its work with community partners like the Richmond Public Library, the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia, and the Descendant Project at the University of Virginia.

With 80 members currently, the AAHGS Greater Richmond Chapter is one of the largest branches of the national organization, with virtual meetings during the pandemic allowing people with roots in the state but who live outside of Virginia to join chapter discussions and workshops.

“I am determined to see our chapter continue on its successful path of sharing genealogical and historical information with the African American community,” he said.

Meet a leader in exploring and documenting African American history and this week’s personality, Lawrence “Larry” Clark:

Volunteer position #1: President of the Greater Richmond Chapter of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society.

Occupation: Retired in 2019 from CarMax Auto Stores after 15 years.

Date and place of birth: 1954 in Buffalo, NY

Where I live now: County of Henrico.

Education: Bachelor of Mathematics from City University of New York, Lehman College.

Family: I was married for 40 years before my wife, Patricia, died of cancer in 2014. I now live with my domestic partner, Artile White. I am the father of four children, grandfather of 10 children and great-grandfather of five children.

The African American Historical and Genealogical Society is: A Washington, DC-based organization that pursues scholarly and educational work on the genealogy and history of African Americans. The purpose of the AAHGS is to provide a membership organization committed to the preservation of the history, genealogy and culture of the ancestral African peoples of the local, national and international community. The AAHGS emphasizes the importance of our history and genealogy by encouraging active participation in recording research and documenting personal family histories.

Date and place of creation: AAHGS was founded in Washington in May 1977. The Greater Richmond chapter was launched in 2010.

Mission: The African American Historical and Genealogical Society, or AAHGS, is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that strives to preserve the family history, genealogy, and cultural diversity of African ancestors by teaching research skills and disseminating information throughout the community. Our primary goals are to promote scientific research, provide resources for historical and genealogical studies, create a network of people with similar interests, and help members document their stories.

Number of chapters: AAHGS currently has 37 state chapters. Virginia has four chapters – Richmond, Newport News, Charlottesville and Danville.

Discoveries since joining the AAHGS: Since joining AAHGS, I have learned a wealth of information about my ancestry and African American family history in general. I am better informed about how our ancestors lived and more importantly how they survived slavery, wars, Jim Crow laws, etc. I researched many of my family’s ancestors and found out where some of them were enslaved in Georgia. While researching my family, I was encouraged by receiving from another genealogist a photo of my great-great-grandfather who was born a slave in 1850. Recently, I have studied and learned more about DNA. I am now collecting DNA from my family members. This work led me to discover a DNA link with white family descendants who were the slavers of my Georgian family.

COVID-19 and AAHGS: So, as the pandemic has changed most of our lives, our chapter has had to change, to move to delivering our meetings and workshops virtually. It gave us the opportunity to reach out to more partners and friends. Our virtual presentations were well attended. We have also experienced an increase in the number of members and interested parties who live outside of the Richmond area. We now have members from Arizona, California, New Jersey, New York and Tennessee who have family roots in Virginia. And in recent months, we are grateful to have participated in virtual joint presentations, in collaboration with some of our partners.

Importance of oral history: Oral history is of utmost importance. People should research their older relatives to understand their family history. Much of the information seniors hold in their heads will not be available on any website or in any public document. A crucial step in this process is recording the oral histories your older parents tell you. It is extremely easy for someone to forget what they have told you. And, sadly, they won’t be around forever.

Research Challenges Facing Black Genealogists: A major challenge that African American genealogists face is that prior to 1865 most of our families were enslaved and there were few records documenting the names and relationships of enslaved people. Although this is a unique challenge for African Americans, information about our ancestors can be found in the records of their white slavers. And nowadays, DNA helps uncover the relationships between our ancestors and the families of their slaveholders.

A perfect day for me: Sitting in a park or on a beach, jazz musicians perform.

Something I love to do that most people would never imagine: I watch all the HGTV home improvement and home repair shows.

Quote that inspires me: “Ask yourself what makes you alive and do it. Because what the world needs are people who have come to life. —Howard Thurman

My friends describe me as: Kind, intelligent and somewhat introverted.

At the top of my to-do list: After the COVID-19 pandemic, travel to places where my ancestors lived.

Best late night snack: Peanuts.

Best thing my parents ever taught me: Along with treating everyone with respect, gaining knowledge and education will lead to a fulfilling and successful life.

Person who influenced me the most: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Book that influenced me the most: “Caste” by Isabel Wilkerson.

What I’m currently reading: “Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Pedigree” by Blaine T. Bettinger.

Next goal: I am determined to see our chapter continue on its successful path of sharing genealogical and historical information with the African American community. And specifically, I look forward to greater efforts and more progress on the revitalization of African American cemeteries in the Greater Richmond area. I believe that efforts to establish a national memorial in the Shockoe Cemetery area at Shockoe Bottom are essential to uncovering and elevating the stories of our African American ancestors.


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New Bern’s African American community focuses on the event https://conservativepetitions.com/new-berns-african-american-community-focuses-on-the-event/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 18:09:40 +0000 https://conservativepetitions.com/new-berns-african-american-community-focuses-on-the-event/ “Traces of Places and Faces of African Americans in the New Bern Community” by Dr. Erroll L. Royal. Dr. Erroll L. Royal of New Bern is set to give a virtual presentation of his most recent book, “Traces of Places and Faces of African Americans from the New Bern Community,” as part of the series […]]]>
“Traces of Places and Faces of African Americans in the New Bern Community” by Dr. Erroll L. Royal.

Dr. Erroll L. Royal of New Bern is set to give a virtual presentation of his most recent book, “Traces of Places and Faces of African Americans from the New Bern Community,” as part of the series of Tryon Palace African-American Lectures.

The program will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 17. Although offered virtually, reservations are required to participate. Email historical interpreter Krystal Eldred at krystal.eldred@ncdcr.gov or call 252-639-3512.

Royal will highlight past and present African Americans in the New Bern area who have made or continue to make significant contributions to the city, surrounding areas and nationally.

“His stories serve to remember the legacy of these African Americans, as their lives will have a lasting impact on the lives of many generations for generations to come,” organizers said.

Royal, a graduate of New Bern Senior High School who, in addition to his doctorate, has earned master’s degrees in multiple areas of study, is a retired educator with more than 40 years as a school administrator.

He is the author of other books including ‘Pembroke: The Road Less Traveled’, ‘No Pain, No Rain, No Gain: Understanding the Meaning of Suffering’ and ‘Twenty Steps to Effective Prayer’.

Royal is working on a sequel to “Traces of Places and Faces of African Americans from the New Bern Community” to remember other personalities not mentioned in the first book.


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